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MJ Estate

Settles War with Chick

From 'Thriller' Video

5/10/2012 3:53 PM PDT BY TMZ STAFF
EXCLUSIVE

0510_ola-ray_thriller_2
Michael Jackson's Estate has finally settled its beef with the girl who played MJ's date in the famed "Thriller" video -- three years after she filed her lawsuit.

TMZ broke the story ... Ola Ray sued MJ and his production company in May 2009 -- the month before Jackson died -- claiming she hadn't been paid royalties from the legendary 1983 music video.



The former Playboy Playmate sued for breach of contract, insisting she was still owed a massive chunk of "Thriller" profits.

We don't know how much the Estate settled for -- but from what we can gather, Ola got something.

"Thriller" director John Landis has filed a similar lawsuit against the Estate. We're told both sides are still trying to negotiate a settlement.

226 COMMENTS

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123.

Dose Of Reality    

SimpleNature

I ASK "YOU" A SIMPLE QUESTION!!!!


DID YOU EVER KNOW MJ PERSONALLY????
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Did you? I know that you, like many stuperfans, have somehow convinced yourself that you did because you identified with "his" music, but did you really know him? I know that you think Ben was written about you, but it wasn't.


As far as MJ's "sexuality, don't confuse his preference for pubescent males as homosexuality, they are quite different.
Did MJ risk loosing half his fan base by condemning homosexuality?

803 days ago
125.

MiMi    

Hmmmm, my post still shows in my profile.


Do Yours????

Oh that's right, you and all your alias's don't have profiles............

803 days ago
126.

Pegasus    

CADEFLAW
On June 25, 2009, the world was rocked by the news of Michael Jackson’s death. To say his passing shook the world is not an exaggeration. People of all nationalities, races, ages, and levels of “Michael” knowledge, talked about the loss of the greatest entertainer of our time. People who were enlightened enough to look beyond the tabloid headlines and the media persecution of Michael, deeply mourned the passing of not only a gifted entertainer, but also of a man: a wonderfully generous, caring, kind, gentle and sometimes shy man. They knew exactly what had been lost on that day in June.

As people in mourning struggled to understand the depth of their emotion and grief, they sought others who shared their feelings. One cause of their continued sorrow was the ongoing degradation of Michael in and by the media. The reporting of rumor, speculation and the rehashing of old lies, began to take a toll on those who loved Michael. Caring, and concerned people came together, and developed ways to honor Michael, and share “the other side of the story".

During this time, a group of people came together to urge the state of California to enact a law that would provide an avenue of legal recourse for family members when a deceased loved one is the object of defamation.

The name of the group is the California Anti-Defamation Law (CADEFLAW).

The inspiration behind this initiative was and is Michael Jackson; however, the law is not intended to cover only Michael. The proposed law will give every citizen, regardless of social standing or status, the right to respect and dignity after they have passed on. It will give every family a chance to stop the pain, suffering, and possible financial loss caused by the defamation of a deceased loved one.

The supporters of CADEFLAW will no longer passively accept the disrespectful and cruel assassination of Michael, or anyone else who is not here to defend themselves.

In this column we will bring you updates on our progress, and share news and information pertinent to it's mission. You can also find more information on our website at http://www.cadeflaw.com/.

Barbara Owens (Group Journalist)

803 days ago
127.

Daybreaker    

DUILAMA

Donna I love you!
Mimi, why don't you drop dead instead?

-------------

My feelings exactly.

Every time a nice person dies, I wonder why are these evil child molesters still hanging around. Worse their supporters seem to be flourishing as time goes by.

803 days ago
129.

HumanNature    

THERE'S ONE CRAZY FOOL WITH MULTIPLIES CLONING PERSONALITIES THAT NEED HELP IMMEDIATELY!!!!!

803 days ago
131.

=)    

Let go of your attachment to being right, and suddenly your mind is more open. You’re able to benefit from the unique viewpoints of others, without being crippled by your own judgment.
Ralph Marston
.
The grace to be a beginner is always the best prayer for an artist. The beginner’s humility and openness lead to exploration. Exploration leads to accomplishment. All of it begins at the beginning, with the first small and scary step.
Julia Cameron
.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8HTLkT-zKM

802 days ago
133.

Pegasus    

Governor Brown Appoints Eight to Los Angeles County Superior Court
Details
Created on Friday, 18 May 2012 12:05
Written by IVN
Sacramento, California - Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today announced the appointments of Debra A. Cole, Halim Dhanidina, Peter A. Hernandez, Bruce G. Iwasaki, H. Clay Jacke II, Virginia Keeny, David B. Walgren and Jeffrey K. Winikow to judgeships in the Los Angeles County Superior Court.

Debra A. Cole, 50, of Long Beach, has served in multiple positions in the Los Angeles County Alternative Public Defender’s Office since 1994, including head deputy, deputy in charge and trial deputy. Cole was a trial deputy in the Los Angeles County Public Defender’s Office from 1988 to 1994. She earned a Juris Doctorate degree from Loyola Law School Los Angeles and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, Los Angeles. She fills the vacancy created by the retirement of Judge Andrew C. Kauffman. Cole is a Democrat.

Halim Dhanidina, 39, of Los Angeles, has served as a deputy district attorney in the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office since 1998. He earned a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Pomona College. He fills the vacancy created by the conversion of a court commissioner position. Dhanidina is a Democrat. According to the Muslim Public Affairs Council, Dhanidina will be the first American-Muslim judge ever appointed in California.

Peter A. Hernandez, 42, of Alhambra, has served as an assistant U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California since 1999. He was a litigation associate at Brobeck, Phleger and Harrison LLP from 1998 to 1999. Previously, Hernandez was a trial attorney in the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice from 1995 to 1998. He earned a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, Berkeley. He fills the vacancy created by the conversion of a court commissioner position. Hernandez is a Democrat.

Bruce G. Iwasaki, 61, of Los Angeles, has been a partner at Lim Ruger and Kim LLP since 2006. He was executive director of the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles from 1997 to 2006 and was an associate at O’Melveny and Myers LLP from 1988 to 1997. From 1980 to 1988, he served in muliple positions at the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles, including senior counsel and staff attorney. He was a staff attorney at San Fernando Valley Neighborhood Legal Services from 1976 to 1980. Iwasaki earned a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, Los Angeles. He fills the vacancy created by the conversion of a court commissioner position. Iwasaki is a Democrat.

H. Clay Jacke II, 53, of Los Angeles, has been a sole criminal defense practitioner since 1983. He earned a Juris Doctorate degree from Southwestern Law School and a Bachelor of Science degree from Drake University. He fills the vacancy created by the conversion of a court commissioner position. Jacke is a Democrat.

Virginia Keeny, 50, of Los Angeles, has been a partner at Hadsell Stormer Keeny Richardson and Renick LLP since 2008. She was a partner at Hadsell and Stormer Inc. from 1993 to 2007 and a senior trial attorney in the Los Angeles District Office of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from 1991 to 1993. Keeny was a public interest fellow at Litt and Stormer from 1989 to 1991. From 1988 to 1989, she served as a law clerk for Judge William A. Norris in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Keeny earned a Juris Doctorate degree from Stanford Law School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Harvard University. She fills the vacancy created by the conversion of a court commissioner position. Keeny is a Democrat.

David B. Walgren, 43, of Calabasas, has served as a deputy district attorney in the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office since 1996. He earned a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of California, Davis School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, Los Angeles. He fills the vacancy created by the conversion of a court commissioner position. Walgren is a Democrat.

Jeffrey K. Winikow, 47, of Los Angeles, has been a sole practitioner since 1992. Previously, he was an associate attorney at Mitchell Silberberg and Knupp LLP from 1989 to 1992. Winikow earned a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of Chicago Law School and a Bachelor of Science degree from Cornell University. He fills the vacancy created by the retirement of Judge William J. Birney Jr. Winikow is a Democrat.

The compensation for each position is $178,789.

802 days ago
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