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Wade Robson

I Don't Need MJ Estate

to Prove Molestation in Court

5/15/2013 9:00 AM PDT BY TMZ STAFF
EXCLUSIVE

0515_wade_robson_mj_getty_tmzWade Robson WILL have his day in court in his attempt to prove he was molested by Michael Jackson ... even if he's shut down by the Michael Jackson Estate.

TMZ has learned ... Robson has filed a civil lawsuit in L.A. County Superior Court ... and it has nothing to do with his creditor's claim against the Estate. We broke the story ... Robson belatedly filed his creditor's claim, alleging MJ molested him between the ages of 7 and 14.

Robson may get shut down by the probate judge because he waited too long to file his claim.  But the civil lawsuit we found will NOT go away that easily.

The allegations in the civil lawsuit are sealed, but TMZ has obtained the face page of the complaint, which shows Robson is suing DOE 1, an individual, DOE 2, a California corporation, and DOE 3, a California corporation.  As for who these anonymous DOES are ... TMZ has done some digging, and it's clear.  Robson is targeting MJJ Productions -- Michael's record label (owned by Sony) which hired Wade when he was 11 -- and MJJ Ventures ... which produced Michael's music videos.
0515-wade-robson-tmz-pull-out
The two corporations may have been involved in bringing Wade to the U.S. from his home in Australia, and it's clear Wade will argue they had some responsibility for protecting him -- kind of like the relationship between priests who molest and the Catholic Church.

As for the individual DOES (Wade names 50 DOES) ... it's very clear from our research that Robson is targeting the two executors of the MJ Estate -- John Branca and John McClain.

Short story -- even if Wade loses in probate court, he can probably have his day in civil court and put Michael Jackson and allegations of molestation before a jury.

0507_wade_robson_footer

288 COMMENTS

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121.

(◉_◉) Brush Your Teeth (◉_◉)    

Who Opened Little Wacko's
Wall Popped The Lid On His
Casket & Took This Picture?


That Took Balls.

494 days ago
122.

MJLover624    

That is NOT a photo of MJ!

493 days ago
123.

Pegasus    

Michael Jackson manager's e-mails found, could be key in AEG trial

By Alan Duke, CNN

updated 10:29 PM EDT, Fri May 17, 2013


Michael Jackson's family is seeking billions in damages, equal to what the pop star might have earned had he lived.


Michael Jackson's family is seeking billions in damages, equal to what the pop star might have earned had he lived.


STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Frank DiLeo's laptop couldn't be found after Jackson's lawyers subpoenaed it
AEG's lawyers represented DiLeo's estate in the fight to stop the subpoena
Another lawyer kept a copy of the manager's e-mail file
Jackson lawyers argue AEG forced Michael Jackson to take DiLeo as his manager

Los Angeles (CNN) -- A cache of e-mails believed lost when Michael Jackson's last manager's laptop disappeared could become key evidence in the wrongful death trial against AEG Live.

Lawyers for Michael Jackson's mother and three children don't know what they'll find in Frank DiLeo's e-mails, but they are hoping it will support their contention that DiLeo was beholden to the concert promoter and not to Jackson.

Jackson changed managers twice in the last three months of his life. In late March 2009, he hired Leonard Rowe -- one of his father's friends -- to replace Tohme Tohme, the manager who initially negotiated the deal with AEG for his "This Is It" tour.

Jackson lawyers argue that AEG Live forced Jackson to take DiLeo, who had worked for him off and on for decades, as his manager in May 2009 because they did not want to work with Rowe.

Their contention is part of their larger argument that AEG Live executives were liable for Jackson's death because they hired, retained or supervised Dr. Conrad Murray, the physician convicted of involuntary manslaughter.

AEG counters that it was Jackson who chose and hired Murray, not them. AEG lawyers argue that Jackson was responsible for his own death and that drug addiction led to his bad decisions.

The coroner ruled his death, which came near the end of preparations for a series of comeback concerts, was caused by an overdose of the surgical anesthetic propofol that Murray was using to treat Jackson's insomnia.

AEG Live contends its executives had no way of knowing the doctor was using propofol in the privacy of Jackson's bedroom.

The Jacksons are seeking billions of dollars in damages, equal to what Michael Jackson might have earned if he had not died on June 25, 2009. The Los Angeles trial began three weeks ago and is expected to continue into July.

The lawsuit contends AEG Live ignored warning signs about Jackson's health in his last weeks, and instead of getting him help they pressured Jackson and Murray to have him at rehearsals. DiLeo would have been part of that pressure, they contend.

"Get him a bucket of chicken," DiLeo said on June 19, 2009, in reply to concerns about Jackson's weight loss, makeup artist Karen Faye testified last week. "It was such a cold response, it broke my heart," Faye said through tears.

The next day -- June 20, 2009 -- DiLeo left a voice mail on Murray's cell phone. "I'm sure you're aware he had an episode last night. He's sick. Today's Saturday. Tomorrow, I'm on my way back. I'm not going to continue my trip. I think you need to get a blood test on him. We got to see what he's doing?"

DiLeo's e-mails were recovered after what the judge called "a lot of red tape and kind of cloudiness," that included the AEG's lawyers also representing the estate of DiLeo, who died in 2011, in fighting the Jacksons' subpoena for them.

"Because (DiLeo's widow) didn't have litigation counsel, we're representing her for the limited purposes of responding to that subpoena," AEG's lead lawyer, Marvin Putnam, told the judge.

Soon after an Ohio court ordered DiLeo's estate to give his laptop and e-mails to the Jackson lawyers, the AEG lawyers -- in their other capacity representing the DiLeo estate -- reported that they could not locate the computer or e-mails.

Jackson lawyers, however, learned that the DiLeo estate's previous lawyer -- Pennsylvania lawyer David Regoli -- kept a copy of the e-mail files. For the past several weeks, however, the AEG lawyers argued he had no authority to provide them to the Jacksons' lawyers for use in the case against AEG.

But in a phone call to the court this week, Regoli said he advised DiLeo's widow, Linda DiLeo, that "in my opinion, it was a conflict" for AEG's lawyers -- from the Los Angeles firm O'Melveny and Myers -- to represent her in the matter.

"She said that she never signed anything with O'Melveny and Myers to authorize them to represent her, and as of this moment they are not representing her anymore," Regoli said.

Linda DiLeo then rehired Regoli, which allows him to send the e-mails on to the Jacksons -- after removing any that are personal or not relevant to the case.

"I think I can give the court my assurances that I'll go through the do***ents that I have and I'll go through the e-mails, and anything that is related to the subpoena, I would obviously turn over," Regoli said.

As for the missing laptop, there was a simple explanation. Linda DiLeo "had told me her daughter had given it to a friend who needed a computer," Regoli said. "It wasn't a very new computer."

While the Jackson lawyers wanted to explore how AEG's lawyers came to represent the DiLeo estate in Ohio, the judge declined exploring the matter.

"All we know right now they're not representing her, and that's enough for us," Judge Yvette Palazuelos said.

The trial's fourth week starts Monday morning with AEG's chief counsel, Shawn Trell, on the witness stand. Jackson lawyers are expected to grill him about the contract negotiations with Michael Jackson and Murray.

493 days ago
124.

Pegasus    

National

Jury hears differing versions of Jackson’s health from defense witnesses in 3rd week of trial


(Joel Ryan, File/ Associated Press ) - File - In this March 5, 2009 file photo, US singer Michael Jackson announces at a press conference that he is set to play ten live concerts at the London O2 Arena in July 2009. Jurors hearing Katherine Jackson’s lawsuit against AEG Live heard from a pair of defense witnesses who gave varying assessments of Jackson’s health as he rehearsed for the “This Is It” show. The testimony in a Los Angeles courtroom by choreographers Stacy Walker and Travis Payne on May 13-14, 2013, was the only evidence in the trial’s third week that focused on the pop superstar.

(Joel Ryan, File/ Associated Press ) - File - In this March 5, 2009 file photo, US singer Michael Jackson announces at a press conference that he is set to play ten live concerts at the London O2 Arena in July 2009. Jurors hearing Katherine Jackson’s lawsuit against AEG Live heard from a pair of defense witnesses who gave varying assessments of Jackson’s health as he rehearsed for the “This Is It” show. The testimony in a Los Angeles courtroom by choreographers Stacy Walker and Travis Payne on May 13-14, 2013, was the only evidence in the trial’s third week that focused on the pop superstar.
(Kevin Mazur, AEG/Getty Images, File/ Associated Press ) - FILE - In this June 23, 2009 handout photo provided by AEG, pop star Michael Jackson rehearses at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. Jurors hearing Katherine Jackson’s lawsuit against AEG Live heard from a pair of defense witnesses who gave varying assessments of Jackson’s health as he rehearsed for the “This Is It” show. The testimony by choreographers Stacy Walker and Travis Payne in a Los Angeles courtroom on May 13-14, 2013, was the only evidence in the trial’s third week that focused on the pop superstar.



By Associated Press,


Updated: Saturday, May 18, 9:15 AM

LOS ANGELES — A look at key moments this past week in the wrongful death trial in Los Angeles between Michael Jackson’s mother, Katherine Jackson, and concert giant AEG Live LLC, and what is expected at court in the week ahead:

THE CASE

.

Jackson’s mother wants a jury to determine that the promoter of Jackson’s planned comeback concerts didn’t properly investigate Dr. Conrad Murray, who a criminal jury convicted of involuntary manslaughter for Jackson’s June 2009 death. AEG’s attorney says the case is about personal choice, namely Jackson’s decision to have Murray serve as his doctor and give him doses of a powerful anesthetic as a sleep aid. Millions, possibly billions, of dollars are at stake.

WHAT HAPPENED

— Jurors heard from AEG Live’s first two witnesses, a pair of choreographers who worked on Jackson’s ill-fated “This Is It” shows. Stacy Walker told the panel she never saw any signs Jackson was impaired or ill during rehearsals. Her colleague Travis Payne, who rehearsed one-on-one with Jackson, acknowledged he couldn’t say how many times the pair actually rehearsed and said he was concerned the singer was under the influence of prescription medications in the weeks before his death.

— An AEG accounting executive testified about the budget for “This Is It,” which was planning on paying Murray up to $1.5 million for the first few months of the shows. The former cardiologist was never paid because Jackson died before signing his contract.

WHAT THE JURY SAW

— Payne shift from a composed, sometimes-smiling witness to one who fought back tears toward the end of his day-and-a-half of testimony. His devotion to Jackson was evident from his wardrobe, which included a black blazer with an emblem stitched onto each sleeve containing the letters “MJ” and golden wings.

— Lots of courthouse hallways and downtown Los Angeles. Friday’s session featured a four-hour lunch break due to witness availability issues. The trial’s third week featured only three days of live testimony and the jury was kept waiting or sent out of the room numerous times while attorneys argued legal issues.

QUOTABLE MOMENTS

— “Sometimes in rehearsal, Michael would appear just a little loopy,” Payne said of Jackson’s demeanor after visiting his longtime dermatologist Dr. Arnold Klein, who is not a party to the case.

— “I just never in a million years thought he would leave us, or pass away,” choreographer Stacy Walker said of Jackson. Walker testified for AEG and said she never saw signs Jackson was under the influence of medications or was ill.

OUTSIDE THE COURTROOM

— A state attorney urged a court to reject an appeal by Jackson’s former doctor, Conrad Murray, stating there were no legal errors by a trial judge and the physician’s own attorneys failed to raise issues at the appropriate time. Murray has shown no remorse for playing “Russian roulette” with Jackson’s life.

WHAT’S NEXT

— A corporate attorney for AEG Live will testify, reflecting a shift in the trial focus away from Jackson and toward a central issue in the case — whether Murray was hired by the concert promoter.

492 days ago
125.

Pegasus    


Jury gets first glimpse of defense in Jackson case

May 18, 2013, 12:13 PM EST

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A look at key moments this past week in the wrongful death trial in Los Angeles between Michael Jackson's mother, Katherine Jackson, and concert giant AEG Live LLC, and what is expected at court in the week ahead:

THE CASE

Jackson's mother wants a jury to determine that the promoter of Jackson's planned comeback concerts didn't properly investigate Dr. Conrad Murray, who a criminal jury convicted of involuntary manslaughter for Jackson's June 2009 death. AEG's attorney says the case is about personal choice, namely Jackson's decision to have Murray serve as his doctor and give him doses of a powerful anesthetic as a sleep aid. Millions, possibly billions, of dollars are at stake.

WHAT HAPPENED

— Jurors heard from AEG Live's first two witnesses, a pair of choreographers who worked on Jackson's ill-fated "This Is It" shows. Stacy Walker told the panel she never saw any signs Jackson was impaired or ill during rehearsals. Her colleague Travis Payne, who rehearsed one-on-one with Jackson, acknowledged he couldn't say how many times the pair actually rehearsed and said he was concerned the singer was under the influence of prescription medications in the weeks before his death.

— An AEG accounting executive testified about the budget for "This Is It," which was planning on paying Murray up to $1.5 million for the first few months of the shows. The former cardiologist was never paid because Jackson died before signing his contract.

WHAT THE JURY SAW

— Payne shift from a composed, sometimes-smiling witness to one who fought back tears toward the end of his day-and-a-half of testimony. His devotion to Jackson was evident from his wardrobe, which included a black blazer with an emblem stitched onto each sleeve containing the letters "MJ" and golden wings.

— Lots of courthouse hallways and downtown Los Angeles. Friday's session featured a four-hour lunch break due to witness availability issues. The trial's third week featured only three days of live testimony and the jury was kept waiting or sent out of the room numerous times while attorneys argued legal issues.

QUOTABLE MOMENTS

— "Sometimes in rehearsal, Michael would appear just a little loopy," Payne said of Jackson's demeanor after visiting his longtime dermatologist Dr. Arnold Klein, who is not a party to the case.

— "I just never in a million years thought he would leave us, or pass away," choreographer Stacy Walker said of Jackson. Walker testified for AEG and said she never saw signs Jackson was under the influence of medications or was ill.

OUTSIDE THE COURTROOM

— A state attorney urged a court to reject an appeal by Jackson's former doctor, Conrad Murray, stating there were no legal errors by a trial judge and the physician's own attorneys failed to raise issues at the appropriate time. Murray has shown no remorse for playing "Russian roulette" with Jackson's life.

WHAT'S NEXT

— A corporate attorney for AEG Live will testify, reflecting a shift in the trial focus away from Jackson and toward a central issue in the case — whether Murray was hired by the concert promoter.

492 days ago
126.

maureen    

lady, wade should of said it 4yrs ago. why now when there is a lawsuit out on AEG.think about it, they want michaels life destrode and that's why he came out for the money.AEG is smart and pay wade by cash, so there is no trace.michael got aqquited and this case w/wade should be dropped.plus wade shouldn't be alound to sue any body.if I was hoolywood I woulnt hire this man atall.lets put his life in danger w/ no jobs and see what he;s wife and child thinks about that

491 days ago
127.

Pegasus    

AEG execs face questions about Michael Jackson's death

By Alan Duke, CNN

updated 10:38 AM EDT, Mon May 20, 2013


The death in 2009 of superstar Michael Jackson, who died of cardiac arrest at the age of 50, sent shockwaves around the world. The death in 2009 of superstar Michael Jackson, who died of cardiac arrest at the age of 50, sent shockwaves around the world.

The Jackson 5 perform on a TV show circa 1969. From left, Tito Jackson, Marlon Jackson, Michael Jackson, Jackie Jackson and Jermaine Jackson.

Michael Jackson quickly became the stand out star of the Jackson 5. Here he performs onstage circa 1970.

Michael Jackson poses during a portrait session in Los Angeles in 1971.

Michael Jackson performs with The Jacksons in New Orleans on October 3, 1979.

Jackson achieved superstardom with his solo career in the 1980s. Here Jackson is shown on stage in Kansas in 1983.

Michael Jackson performs on stage circa 1990.

Jackson broke a world record during the Bad tour in 1988 when 504,000 people attending seven sold-out shows at Wembley Stadium in London.

Jackson perfoms in concert circa 1991 in New York City.

Known for his dance moves, Jackson is seen here jumping in the air while performing during the Dangerous tour in 1992.

Michael Jackson performs in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Jackson performs with his brothers.

Jackson performs during the Bad tour at Wembley Stadium in London.

Jackson performs during the taping of "American Bandstand's 50th: A Celebration" in 2002.

Michael Jackson earned the Legend Award during the MTV Video Music Awards in Tokyo in 2006.

HIDE CAPTION


Michael Jackson, King of Pop

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
AEG Live's top lawyer will testify as trial's 4th week begins
Jackson lawyer will question AEG Live general counsel about negotiations with Dr. Murray
AEG Live's controller confirms the company budgeted $1.5 million to pay for Michael Jackson's doctor
An AEG expert testifies the promoter should have seen "a red flag" when Murray asked for $5 million

Los Angeles (CNN) -- AEG Live filed an insurance claim to recover losses from Michael Jackson's death the same day he died, according to a lawyer for Jackson's family.

That revelation may not relate to the heart of the wrongful death lawsuit against Michael Jackson's last concert promoter, but Jackson lawyers hope it could sway jurors to see AEG Live executives as motivated by money over the pop icon's needs.

It is one of many points Jackson lawyers will try to make Monday when they call AEG Live's top lawyer to the witness stand as the trial's fourth week begins in a Los Angeles courtroom.

Jackson's mother and three children contend AEG Live is liable in the singer's death because its executives negligently hired, retained or supervised Dr. Conrad Murray, who was convicted of involuntary manslaughter.


Katherine Jackson: Michael's mother, 82, was deposed for nine hours over three days by AEG Live lawyers. As the guardian of her son's three children, she is a plaintiff in the wrongful death lawsuit against the company that promoted Michael Jackson's comeback concerts.


Prince Jackson: Michael's oldest son is considered a key witness in the Jacksons' case against AEG Live, since he is expected to testify about what his father told him about the concert promoter in the last days of his life. Prince, who turned 16 in February, is becoming more independent -- he now has a driver's license and jobs.


Paris Jackson: Michael's daughter, who turns 15 on April 3, is on the list of witnesses and was questioned by AEG Live lawyers for several hours on March 21 about her father's death. Paris is an outspoken teen who often posts messages to her 1 million-plus Twitter followers.


Blanket Jackson: Although AEG Live asked the judge to order Blanket, 11, to sit for a deposition, and he is one of the four plaintiffs suing them, Michael's youngest son will not be a witness in the trial. His doctor submitted a note to the court saying it would be "medically detrimental" to the child.


Kevin Boyle: The Los Angeles personal injury lawyer is leading the Jackson team of at least six attorneys in the wrongful death suit against AEG Live. One of his notable cases was a large settlement with Boeing on behalf of two soldiers injured when their helicopter malfunctioned and crashed in Iraq.


Perry Sanders, Jr.: Katherine Jackson's personal lawyer is helping steer the Jackson matriarch through her relations with her son's estate, probate court and the wrongful death suit. He is also known for representing the family of Biggie Smalls in their suit against the city of Los Angeles over the rapper's death investigation.


Marvin Putnam: He's the lead lawyer for AEG Live, defending against the wrongful death suit. The primary focus of his legal practice is "media in defense of their First Amendment rights," according to his official biography.


Philip Anschutz: The billionaire owner of AEG, parent company of AEG Live, is on the Jacksons' witness list. He is the force behind the effort to build a football stadium in downtown Los Angeles to lure a National Football League team to the city. He recently pulled his company off the market after trying to sell it for $8 billion.


Tim Leiweke: He was recently fired as AEG's president as Philip Anschutz announced he was taking a more active role in the company. The Jackson lawyers say Leiweke's e-mail exchanges with executives under him concerning Michael Jackson's health are important evidence in their case.


Joe Jackson: Michael's father, 84, is on the witness list for the trial and may testify. The Jackson family patriarch, who lives in Las Vegas separately from his wife, has suffered several ministrokes in the last year, which some close to him say have affected him.


Randy Phillips: He's president of AEG Live, the concert promoter that contracted with Michael Jackson for his "This Is It" comeback shows set to start in London in July 2009. The Jackson lawsuit says Phillips supervised Dr. Conrad Murray's treatment of Jackson in the weeks before his death, making the company liable for damages. E-mails between Phillips and other executives showed they were worried about Jackson's missed rehearsals and sought Murray's help getting him ready.


Paul Gongaware: The AEG Live co-CEO worked closely with Michael Jackson as he prepared for his comeback concerts. He testified at Dr. Conrad Murray's criminal trial that he contacted the physician and negotiated his hiring at the request of Jackson. AEG lawyers say it was Jackson who chose, hired and supervised Murray. Gongaware knew Jackson well, having been tour manager for the singer in previous years.


Kenny Ortega: He was chosen by Michael Jackson and AEG Live to direct and choreograph the "This Is It" shows. Ortega, who choreographed for Jackson's "Dangerous" and "HIStory" tours, testified at Dr. Conrad Murray's criminal trial that "Jackson was frail" at a rehearsal days before his death.


Dr. Conrad Murray: He was Michael Jackson's personal physician in the two months before his death, giving him nightly infusions of the surgical anesthetic that the coroner ruled led to his death. Murray, who is appealing his involuntary manslaughter conviction, has sworn that he would invoke his Fifth Amendment protection from self-incrimination and refused to testify in the civil trial. There is a chance that Murray will be brought into court from jail to testify outside the presence of the jury to allow the judge to determine if he would be ordered to testify.


John Branca: He's one of two executors of Michael Jackson's estate. Branca was Jackson's lawyer until about seven years before his death. He said Jackson rehired him just weeks before he died.



The promoters ignored a series of red flags that should have warned them Jackson was in danger as he was pressured to get ready for his comeback concerts, the Jackson lawsuit claims.

Jackson manager's e-mails found, could be key in AEG trial

AEG Live lawyers counter that it was Jackson who chose, hired and supervised Murray, and that he was responsible for his own bad decisions. Its executives could not be expected to know Murray was using the surgical anesthetic propofol, the drug the coroner ruled killed him, to treat his insomnia, they argue.

Jackson lead lawyer Brian Panish will question AEG Live general counsel Shawn Trell about his company's negotiations with Murray to be Jackson's personal physician for his "This Is It" shows in London.

The doctor signed the contract prepared by AEG lawyers and sent it back to the company a day before Jackson's death. The company argues it was not an executed contract because their executives and Michael Jackson never signed it.

The Jackson lawyers argue that e-mails, budget do***ents and the fact that the doctor was already working for two months showed a binding agreement between AEG and Murray.

Panish, speaking outside of the courtroom Friday, said he would also ask Trell about AEG's insurance claim, which he said his team recently discovered was filed with Lloyds of London on June 25, 2009, hours after Jackson was pronounced dead at UCLA Medical Center.

Wade Robson calls Michael Jackson 'a pedophile'

A Lloyds of London underwriter later sued AEG, claiming the company failed to disclose information about the pop star's health and drug use. AEG dropped its claim for a $17.5 million insurance policy last year.

Monday's court will start with AEG Live controller Julie Hollander completing her testimony about the company's budgeting, which she acknowledged included $1.5 million approved to pay Murray. The doctor's costs were listed as production costs, expenses that AEG is responsible for paying, and not as an advance, which Jackson would ultimately be responsible for giving back to the company, she testified.

The controller's testimony appears to contradict the argument AEG lead lawyer Marvin Putnam made in a CNN interview days before the trial began.

Choreographer: AEG considered pulling plug on comeback

AEG Live's role with Murray was only to "forward" money owed to him by Jackson, just as a patient would use their "MasterCard," Putnam said. "If you go to your doctor and you pay with a credit card, obviously MasterCard in that instance, depending on your credit card, is providing the money to that doctor for services until you pay it back. Now, are you telling them MasterCard in some measure in that instance, did MasterCard hire the doctor or did you? Well, clearly you did. I think the analogy works in this instance."

Jackson lawyers played video testimony of one of AEG's own expert witnesses Friday -- 25-year veteran tour manager Marty Hom.

The opinion Hom submitted for AEG concluded he saw no red flags that should have alerted the promoter that something was wrong with Murray.

He was asked if AEG Live should have realized something was wrong when Murray initially asked for $5 million a year to work as Jackson's personal physician. "That raised a red flag because of the enormous sum of money," Hom testified.

Hom acknowledged he had not seen many of the do***ents and depositions in the case, and AEG was considering him for a job as the Rollings Stones tour manager at the same time he was asked to testify.

491 days ago
128.

Pegasus    


Jackson concert director worked without contract

May 20, 2013, 7:16 PM EST

By ANTHONY McCARTNEY , AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A corporate attorney for AEG Live LLC says Michael Jackson's doctor was not the only person working on the singer's ill-fated "This Is It" tour without a fully executed contract.

AEG General Counsel Shawn Trell told a Los Angeles jury on Monday that the tour's director Kenny Ortega was being paid based on an agreement laid out solely in emails.

Jackson's mother is trying to show AEG was negligent in hiring Conrad Murray, the doctor later convicted of involuntary manslaughter in connection with Jackson's June 2009 death.

Michael Jackson died before signing a $150,000 a month contract for Murray to serve as his doctor on the "This Is It" tour.

AEG's attorneys say Jackson's signature was required to finalize Murrays' contract.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

Do***ents prepared by a concert promoter that were detailed in court on Monday indicated the company had budgeted $150,000 a month for a doctor to treat Michael Jackson as he prepared and delivered a series of comeback shows.

However, Jackson died of an anesthetic overdose before he signed the agreement, and no payments were made to Dr. Conrad Murray by AEG Live LLC, testimony and the records show.

The do***ents were presented by lawyers for Katherine Jackson, the singer's mother as they attempt to show an employment relationship existed between Murray and AEG.

Katherine Jackson is suing AEG, claiming it was negligent in hiring Murray and that it missed numerous red flags about the singer's health before he died.

Murray was later convicted of involuntary manslaughter after he administered a fatal dose of a powerful anesthetic to the singer.

AEG denies it hired Murray and says it bears no liability for Jackson's death. Attorneys for the company have said Jackson concealed his addiction to propofol, the drug that killed him

Julie Hollander, a vice president and controller of event operations for AEG Live, testified Monday that Murray's contract was the only one she had ever seen that required approval by an artist for services on a tour.

She believed Jackson's signature was required because of the personal nature of the doctor's services.

In total, Murray was projected to receive $1.5 million in payments over the first few months of the "This Is It" shows.

Hollander was the first AEG executive to testify in the lawsuit. The company's general counsel Shawn Trell began testifying later in the day.

Panish questioned Trell about a July letter sent to Jackson's estate asking for more than $30 million in reimbursement, including $300,000 for Murray's services.

Trell said it was a mistake to include Murray's payments as production costs.

Hollander also testified that Jackson was responsible for 95 percent of production expenses if his comeback shows were canceled.

The budget do***ents showed the company had spent $24 million producing the concerts through October 2009, roughly three months after the singer's death. The production was more than $2 million over budget, the records show.

In recent years, AEG has received 10 percent of the proceeds from the film "This Is It" that was released after the death of Jackson.

490 days ago
129.

Pegasus    

Lawyer: Michael Jackson’s doctor not only person working on ill-fated tour without contract


(Joel Ryan, file/ Associated Press ) - FILE - In this March 5, 2009 file photo, Michael Jackson announces several concerts at the London O2 Arena in July, at a press conference at the London O2 Arena. An AEG Live accounting executive testified Monday, May 20, 2013, in a Los Angeles courtroom that the company spent $24 million on preparations for Jackson’s ill-fated “This Is It” shows, however never paid the singer’s personal doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter because a fully-signed agreement was never obtained.

(Joel Ryan, file/ Associated Press ) - FILE - In this March 5, 2009 file photo, Michael Jackson announces several concerts at the London O2 Arena in July, at a press conference at the London O2 Arena. An AEG Live accounting executive testified Monday, May 20, 2013, in a Los Angeles courtroom that the company spent $24 million on preparations for Jackson’s ill-fated “This Is It” shows, however never paid the singer’s personal doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter because a fully-signed agreement was never obtained.
(Kevin Mazur, AEG/Getty Images, File/ Associated Press ) - FILE - In this June 23, 2009 handout photo provided by AEG, pop star Michael Jackson rehearses at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. An AEG Live accounting executive testified Monday, May 20, 2013, in a Los Angeles courtroom that the company spent $24 million on preparations for Jackson’s ill-fated “This Is It” shows, however never paid the singer’s personal doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter because a fully-signed agreement was never obtained.

By Associated Press,


Updated: Monday, May 20, 5:07 PM

LOS ANGELES — Michael Jackson’s doctor was not the only person working on the singer’s ill-fated “This Is It” tour without a fully executed contract, a corporate attorney for concert promoter AEG Live LLC testified Monday.

The tour’s director Kenny Ortega was being paid based on an agreement laid out solely in emails, AEG General Counsel Shawn Trell told jurors.

Jackson’s mother is trying to show AEG was negligent in hiring Conrad Murray, the doctor who was later convicted of involuntary manslaughter in Jackson’s June 2009 death.

Katherine Jackson claims AEG failed to properly investigate Murray before hiring him to serve as her son’s tour physician, and that the company missed or ignored red flags about the singer’s health before his death. AEG denies it hired Murray.

In court, attorneys for Katherine Jackson displayed emails sent a month before the death of her son in which Murray’s contract terms were laid out.

Trell said those emails did not demonstrate an employment relationship — a key element of the case that will be decided by a jury of six men and six women.

Trell acknowledged, however, that Ortega was paid for his work on the shows despite working under terms laid out only in a series of emails.

“Kenny Ortega is different from Conrad Murray,” Trell testified.

Michael Jackson died before signing a $150,000 a month contract for Murray to serve as his doctor on the “This Is It” tour. AEG’s attorneys say Jackson’s signature was required to finalize Murrays’ contract.

An email displayed in court showed Murray’s contract terms. Other do***ents indicated AEG budgeted $300,000 to pay Murray for his work with Jackson in May and June of 2009.

Another email said executive Paul Gongaware informed others that Murray would be “full time” on the tour by mid-May.

Plaintiff’s attorney Brian Panish asked Trell to agree with a statement that Murray was working for AEG.

“I would totally disagree with that statement,” Trell said, noting that Ortega and Murray were considered independent contractors.

Trell was the second AEG executive to testify in the trial, which is entering its fourth week. AEG attorneys have yet to question him.

He also testified that the company obtained an insurance policy that covered the possible cancellation of some of the “This Is It” shows after a physician evaluated the singer.

Trell testified that five days before Jackson’s death, top AEG executives were informed the singer was in poor health. By that point, Ortega had sent executives an email titled “Trouble at the front” detailing Jackson’s problems.

“There are strong signs of paranoia, anxiety, and obsessive-like behavior,” Ortega wrote to AEG Live CEO Randy Phillips. Jackson’s symptoms were reminiscent of behavior that led to the cancellation of an HBO concert earlier in the decade. Ortega wrote.

490 days ago
130.

Pegasus    

Witness: AEG spent $24 million on Jackson concerts
Associated PressBy ANTHONY McCARTNEY | Associated Press – 21 hrs ago..

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.FILE - In this March 5, 2009 file photo, Michael Jackson announces several concerts at the London O2 Arena in July, at a press conference at the London O2 Arena. An AEG Live accounting executive testified Monday, May 20, 2013, in a Los Angeles courtroom that the company spent $24 million on preparations for Jackson’s ill-fated “This Is It” shows, however never paid the singer’s personal doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter because a fully-signed agreement was never obtained. (AP Photo/Joel Ryan, file)View Photo.
FILE - In this March 5, 2009 file …

.FILE - In this June 23, 2009 handout photo provided by AEG, pop star Michael Jackson rehearses at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. An AEG Live accounting executive testified Monday, May 20, 2013, in a Los Angeles courtroom that the company spent $24 million on preparations for Jackson’s ill-fated “This Is It” shows, however never paid the singer’s personal doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter because a fully-signed agreement was never obtained. (AP Photo/ Kevin Mazur, AEG/Getty Images, File) ** NO SALES, ARCHIVE OUT. MANDATORY CREDIT **View Photo.
FILE - In this June 23, 2009 handout …

.LOS ANGELES (AP) — An accounting executive for AEG Live LLC testified on Monday that the company spent $24 million producing Michael Jackson's ill-fated "This Is It" concerts.

The tally involved expenses compiled through October 2009, roughly three months after the singer's death, said Julie Hollander, a vice president and controller of event operations for AEG Live.

Hollander testified during the trial of a lawsuit filed by Jackson's mother against AEG claiming the company was negligent in hiring the doctor later convicted in the death of the pop star.

Budget do***ents shown in court indicated the company made no payments to the doctor, Conrad Murray.

AEG budgeted $150,000 a month for Murray's treatment of Jackson, but the singer died of an anesthetic overdose before he signed Murray's agreement.

Hollander said Murray's contract was the only one she had ever seen in which an artist had to approve a contract for services on a tour. She believed Jackson's signature was required because of the personal nature of the doctor's services.

In total, Murray was projected to receive $1.5 million in payments over the first few months of the "This Is It" tour, which was slated for 50 shows at London's 02 Arena.

Attorneys for Jackson's mother are trying to prove that AEG hired Murray and missed numerous red flags about the pop singer's health before his death.

AEG denies it hired Murray and says it bears no liability for Jackson's death.

Hollander also testified that Jackson was responsible for 95 percent of production expenses if his comeback shows were canceled. Budget do***ents indicated the production was more than $2 million over budget.

Hollander was the first AEG executive to testify in the lawsuit. The company's general counsel Shawn Trell began testifying on Monday.

Plaintiff's attorney Brian Panish questioned Trell about a July letter sent to Jackson's estate asking for more than $30 million in reimbursement, including $300,000 for Murray's services.

Trell said it was a mistake to include Murray's payments as production costs.

489 days ago
131.

Galina    

Это ваша Америка изнасиловала Майкла Джексона на глазах всего мира, и продолжает насиловать после смерти. А ведь могли бы просто гордиться, что ваша земля родила такого человека. Но деньги не пахнут.

489 days ago
132.

EMF    

He is an outright liar. So if he gets shut down by trying to file a creditor claim on the Estate, he's going to civil court... who's paying his attorney? And he said it isn't about money .. creditor claims and civil suits are ALL ABOUT MONEY. WR has no credibility and his 'career' was all but over long ago. Another leech sucking on the legacy of MJ and his work. AEG Live is behind all of this. They said it was going to get ugly. Yeah, AEG, all the crooks that work in your employ are part of this mud slinging and tarnishing of MJ's legacy. AEG's case isn't going so well is it? Gotta keep the public dumbed down with your LIES and CROOKED ways.

489 days ago
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