TMZ

Our TV Shows

Got a Tip?

Call TMZ at (888) 847-9869 or Click Here

Selena Gomez

Bailed On Rehab

2/6/2014 1:00 AM PST BY TMZ STAFF
EXCLUSIVE

0205-selena-gomez-meadows-getty
Selena Gomez ignored the advice of medical professionals and waltzed out of rehab just 14 days into a 6-week program ... over the strenuous objections of the rehab staff ... TMZ has learned.

Sources close to Selena tell us just after New Year's she checked into a program at The Meadows called DAWN  -- for alcohol, pot and Rx Ambien -- in addition to what her people believe is an unhealthy union with Justin Bieber.

But 2 weeks in, Selena bailed so she could go the Sundance Film Festival for her upcoming movie.  She told her people she would return to the rehab facility after Sundance, but when it was over Selena decided she was cured and there was no reason to return.

0206-selena-gomez-sundance-04
Problem is ...  that's not the way the medical staff at The Meadows sees it ... the treatment program is 45-days and Selena bailed four weeks early.  We're told the staff feels it's essential in any recovery to complete the therapy.

Selena is telling her people ... she completed the toughest week, which the facility calls "Survivor's week" so everything is fine.  Thing is ... Selena's not the doctor -- she's the one with the problem.

0205_selena_gomez_through_years_footer 

Miranda Kerr & Orlando Bloom

Hot & Cold

1/26/2010 4:30 AM PST BY TMZ STAFF

While you were at work on Monday, Orlando Bloom chilled at Sundance as his girlfriend Miranda Kerr frolicked in the waters off St. Bart's.

0910_media_removed_Spencer_Pratt
Don't feel so bad, it's not like they're gorgeous and rich too.

Paris Hilton -- Karaoke Challenged

1/24/2008 4:00 PM PST BY TMZ STAFF

Paris Hilton has Bette Davis' eyes -- and apparently her voice too.


Mess Hilton was at Sundance on Sunday, torturing attendees with her vocal stylings at a private party. First the world had to endure her album, now she's back to throw salt on the wounds!

Sundancing in the Dark -- Blackout Kills Parties

1/19/2008 12:40 PM PST BY TMZ STAFF

Tons of huge stars are partying at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah right now -- but they're all gettin' down in the dark!


We just got word that a major power outage in the city has turned the lights out on Main Street. Spies inside several parties including the Hard Rock Hotel Flaunt Magazine party tell us stars like Brittany Murphy, Paris Hilton and Mos Def are standing around in total darkness while the city figures out how to get the lights back on.

Bummer!

Screech and Arnold Compete for Free S**t

1/24/2007 7:53 AM PST BY TMZ STAFF

Dustin Diamond is trying to out-swag Gary Coleman at Sundance this week, and he's going back for seconds to do it.
Dustin Diamond, Gary Coleman
The aging child stars have been spotted around Park City with dueling camera crews following their every move. Coleman's rep tells TMZ he's in town to shoot a short film (get it? short film), though he wouldn't say any more about it. Diamond says he came to Sundance to "outgift" Coleman.

"My crew is going to be filming me come along and outdoing Gary Coleman," Screech told the Website iklipz.com, adding, "bigger and better and more expensive swag in every way, shape and form."

To do so, Diamond isn't above a little begging. He was at the Karl Feinstein Style Lounge when he got a crystal quartz charm bracelet from designer Kathleen Cavalaro. Then he tried to charm more out of Kathleen, but she wasn't having it. Sex tape stars don't get special treatment from her!

Tara Reid is the Meat in a Rapper Sandwich

1/23/2007 4:14 PM PST BY TMZ STAFF

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS!!!!

If Tara Reid wants to shake her party girl image, she should probably reconsider performing simulated sex with rappers onstage.

TMZ obtained exclusive footage from Sundance of Tara, moments after she climbed onstage at the Blender Sessions party at Tao nightclub, while Akon performed his hit song, "Smack That." And for this performance, the "that" was Tara Reid.Tara mounted then gyrated on Akon as he pretended to pump her all around the stage. One of his mohawked band members decided to get in on the action, and the two bounced Tara around between them.

After the hardcore ride, a discombobulated Reid was consoled by platinum-toothed rapper, Nelly. It's safe to assume that if he began singing "Hot in Herre," Tara would have probably taken off her clothes.

Release Your Inner Filmmaker

10/3/2006 6:39 PM PDT BY TMZ STAFF

How many of you have sat around with some friends, criticizing an episode of "The Outer Limits" or "Battlestar Galactica" and thought, "I could do much better." Well ... it's finally time to put up or shut up.
Exposure
The Sci-Fi Channel, in conjunction with the Sundance Channel, is launching an eight-week long short film competition to find the world's next great science fiction auteur.

The competition, aptly titled "Exposure," will search for the best 2-8 minute sci-fi, horror or fantasy short. Films will be judged by a committee of Sci-Fi Channel and Sundance Channel experts, who will post the best flicks on the Internet each week. Fans will then vote for eight weekly champions to compete in an on-air special on the Sci Fi Channel. Viewers will vote online to determine the grand prize winner.

Submissions are welcomed from now until November 20th. Online voting will begin October 23rd.

So, bust out your wizard hat and slather on your best alien makeup, because now is your chance to show the world that you've got what it takes to become the next Ridley Scott or Peter Jackson.

"Black Snake Moan" Wants Your Trailer Talent

9/25/2006 7:27 PM PDT BY TMZ STAFF

Christina RicciThe upcoming "Black Snake Moan" starring Samuel L. Jackson, Justin Timberlake and Christina Ricci has taken an unsual approach in promoting the film.

Paramount Vantage has created a contest that challenges fans to download artwork and audio from the film and create a trailer for the new movie. The winner gets a trip to the Sundance Film festival.

Set in Tennessee, the southern gothic film chronicles a tale of rage and love when ex-blues guitarist Lazarus (Samuel L. Jackson) discovers Rae (Christina Ricci) beaten nearly to death along side the road. Lazarus decides to cure Rae, a woman known for her insatiable desire for sex, of what he thinks are her wicked ways. All the while Rae's true love Ronnie (Justin Timberlake), who is supposed to be headed to Iraq, goes looking for her.

With a tale like that, folks are sure to come up with some interesting ideas for the trailer.

Redford Says Sundance Taken by a 'Fever'

2/23/2006 2:03 PM PST BY TMZ STAFF

By JAKE COYLE, AP ENTERTAINMENT WRITER

Robert Redford says his Sundance Film Festival, which last month wrapped its 25th season, is "almost to a breaking point."

"It's gotten to the point now — almost to a breaking point — where there's a fever that has taken over the festival that creates an enormous amount of chaos and excitement and tension," the 68-year-old actor said in a recent interview with The Associated Press. "It's gotten a little bit harder on me."

Though the festival has become a larger spectacle over the years, Redford has long refrained from criticism about the changed nature of Sundance.

He created the independent film festival in 1981 to bring attention to small-budget films and new talent. Redford named the festival, held annually in the snowy mountains of Utah, after his breakthrough role in 1969's "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid."

"The festival that we do is the same one as we did the first year," he said. "We program it exactly the same every year, which is for new voices and more experimental films."

The difference now, Redford said, is everything surrounding it.

"Once the merchants come, then the celebrities come. Once they come, the paparazzi come. Once they come, fashion comes. So suddenly you've got a party ... where Paris Hilton's there and all the attention goes there and she's got nothing to do with anything."

"You've basically got two festivals going," he said. "You've got the festival we programmed, which stays the same, and then the other one."

The big-screen life of the festival, Redford said, continues to thrive. He felt "very good" about this year's crop of films, which included the Hispanic teen drama "Quinceanera" and "Iraq in Fragments," a documentary about the lives of Iraqis under U.S. occupation.

"Quinceanera" won both the festival's jury prize and audience award; "Iraq in Fragments" won three prizes including documentary film editing, directing and cinematography awards.

Sundance Doc Rates the Raters Who Catalog Movie Content

1/25/2006 3:12 PM PST BY TMZ STAFF

Kirby Dick has rated the movie-ratings board and come to a blunt conclusion: This panel is not suitable for any audiences.


His documentary "This Film Is Not Yet Rated," premiering Wednesday at the Sundance Film Festival, is a harsh indictment of the ratings system overseen by the Motion Picture Association of America, the trade group for Hollywood's top studios.

Dick calls the ratings process a form of censorship carried out by unqualified film judges who operate in secrecy, their procedures favoring big studio fare over movies from independent and overseas filmmakers.

"Independent film tends to focus more on sexuality. Studios tend to put out films that have more to do with violence," said Dick, a 2004 Academy Awards nominee for his documentary "Twist of Faith." "Violent films get through almost unscathed, but the ratings have this excessive focus against sexuality that puts independent film at a disadvantage."

"This Film Is Not Yet Rated" examines the history of the ratings system, set up in the 1960s by MPAA boss Jack Valenti, who retired as head of the group in 2004 and gave up control of the ratings system last fall.

The film-ratings board, made up of people meant to represent typical American parents, views movies and brands them with G, PG, PG-13, R or NC-17 ratings.

Dick said ratings-board members are thrown in to the job with no clear standards and that they lack the expertise to make sound judgments about the psychological effects film content might have on children.

Ratings can be wildly inconsistent from movie to movie, and challenging a rating is stacked against filmmakers, since the MPAA also controls the appeals process, Dick said.

The documentary chronicles Dick's efforts to pin down ratings-board members, whose identities are kept private, and find out how they operate. He hires a private investigator who's fiercely determined to flush out the people behind the ratings system.

She rifles through the trash of one ratings-board member, stakes out the MPAA offices to run license plates of cars pulling in and out, tails the group's employees and eavesdrops on them when they go to lunch.

And Dick eventually identifies board members.

"There's kind of a David and Goliath quality. Here's this big, powerful organization being investigated by a small independent filmmaker and a colorful P.I.," Dick said.

Dan Glickman, Valenti's successor as MPAA chief, said he normally does not watch films submitted for ratings but that he viewed most of "This Film Is Not Yet Rated" when Dick presented it because he "heard they used unusual surveillance techniques to follow our raters around."

"I decided the privacy of our employees was in jeopardy. I didn't know if there was some violation of law, maybe, but I thought that was going way too far," Glickman said.

"So I watched the movie, at least parts of the movie that were relevant here. I didn't think it was a fair reflection of the ratings system, but I think Americans will have to judge that for themselves," Glickman said.

Joan Graves, who heads the ratings board, said she spent two hours on the phone with Dick explaining the ratings process to him, "so his secrecy thing, I think, is a little bit disingenuous."

Dick includes interviews with filmmakers and actors involved with movies that received NC-17 ratings -- which prohibit anyone younger than 17 from seeing the films. Among the lineup: John Waters ("Pink Flamingoes," "A Dirty Shame"), Kevin Smith ("Clerks"), "South Park" co-creator Matt Stone ("Team America: World Police"), Kimberly Pierce ("Boys Don't Cry") and Maria Bello ("The Cooler").

"This Film Is Not Yet Rated" received an NC-17 rating itself because it includes explicit footage from many films that received an NC-17 for sexual content.

The rating allowed Dick to get an inside view of the appeals process, which he incorporated into the version of the documentary screening at Sundance, where he hopes to land a theatrical distributor for the film. His appeal of the NC-17 rating was denied.

"I hope that by the time my next film comes through, there's a different system in place," Dick said. "I would prefer an open system with standards, and if they're going to have guidelines, have the guidelines so that filmmakers know what they're working with and against, and there's something there to publicly advocate for and against. That's the democratic system."

Aniston and Friends Forgotten at Sundance

1/20/2006 1:08 PM PST BY TMZ STAFF

By DAVID GERMAIN, AP MOVIE WRITER

Filmmaker Nicole Holofcener warned the Sundance Film Festival crowd she was nervous.


And she proved it in remarks that preceded the premiere of her film "Friends With Money," forgetting to introduce her quartet of stars: Jennifer Aniston, Frances McDormand, Catherine Keener and Joan Cusack.

"Friends With Money" opened the festival to a packed theater Thursday night, with Sundance Institute founder Robert Redford and festival director Geoffrey Gilmore offering remarks before Holofcener came up.

Holofcener thanked many others on the film, executives at distributor Sony Pictures Classics, her casting director and editor, the male co-stars, including Jason Isaacs, Scott Caan, Simon McBurney and Greg Germann.

Then she started to leave, only rushing back to the podium after Gilmore reminded her she had neglected to mention the lead actresses.

"I forgot you guys. They are a very integral part of the movie," Holofcener joked as Aniston, McDormand, Keener and Cusack took the stage beside her.

"Friends With Money" stars Aniston as a lovable, unmarried pothead who quits her job teaching at a private school and scrapes by cleaning houses as her well-to-do married pals (McDormand, Keener and Cusack) offer advice and sympathy while messing up their own lives in creative ways.

The film is due in theaters this spring.

Sundance, the nation's top showcase for independent film, will present 120 feature films during its 11-day run.

During a question-and-answer session with the audience after the premiere, writer-director Holofcener said the idea originated with the thought that money -- and the mix of those who have it and those who don't -- would make for an interesting dynamic.

Cusack seemed to politely disagree that finance was at the heart of the film.

"It's not really about money," Cusack said. "It's about being centered. Money is kind of a symbol of how you are in your life and how you're going to be centered."

And Keener, who starred in Holofcener's previous films "Walking and Talking" and "Lovely & Amazing," politely refuted Cusack.

"I don't agree, because I feel money has a lot to do with how everyone's centered," Keener said. "I think if it were a level playing field, then we'd all see where everyone is at."

Aniston mostly kept quiet, the former "Friends" star offering a curt response when asked why she did a small independent film when she has so many other options.

"You saw the movie," Aniston said, adding she had wanted to work with her fellow actresses and Holofcener.

Sundance Retains Indie Spirit, Redford Says

1/19/2006 2:55 PM PST BY TMZ STAFF

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Sundance Film festival may look as though it's gone Hollywood with all the celebrity bashes and corporate logos splashed around town. But those are trappings outside the control of Sundance, which has never wavered from its mission of discovery for new film talent, said Robert Redford, whose Sundance Institute oversees the festival.


At a news conference as the 11-day festival opened Thursday, Redford said Sundance's knack for showcasing films that went on to commercial success drew marketers hoping to share the limelight.

"Once the festival achieved a certain level of notoriety, then people began to come here with agendas that were not the same as ours," Redford said. "We can't do anything about that. We can't control that."

While film fans crowd festival theaters to catch some of the 120 feature-length movies playing at Sundance, this ski-resort town buzzes with parties, concerts and other events to promote products ranging from jewelry and jeans to washing machines and sports-utility vehicles.

One reporter asked Redford if Sundance had evolved into a festival with a "Butch Cassidy" or a "Sundance Kid" personality, referring to the actor's pairing with Paul Newman in "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid."

"Neither one," said Redford, who played Sundance to Newman's Butch. "It's hard for me to answer questions about `Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.' And also, it's such a commercial phrasing. I don't know that we've seen ourselves in that perspective. You might say `Treasure of the Sierra Madre."'

Stars Line Up at Sundance

1/18/2006 4:20 PM PST BY TMZ STAFF

By DAVID GERMAIN, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARK CITY, Utah -- Actors are directing. Singers are acting. Drama directors are making concert films. Former presidential rivals Al Gore and Ralph Nader are hitting the big screen.

And Hollywood's much-maligned system of rating movies stars in its own film.

The Sundance Film Festival, the country's foremost showcase for independent cinema, gets under way Thursday with an intriguing mix of role reversals among its cast.

Gore and Nader lead what's shaping up as a powerhouse year for documentaries, always a strong suit at Sundance. Director Davis Guggenheim's "An Inconvenient Truth" chronicles former Vice President Gore's dogged campaign to convince a reluctant society of fossil-fuel profiteers and consumers about the dangers of global warming.

Nader, viewed by critics as the spoiler whose campaign kept Gore out of the White House in the 2000 election, is the subject of Henriette Mantel and Stephen Skrovan's "An Unreasonable Man," a portrait of the crusader for consumer rights and safety.

Around The Web