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This Week's Biggest Losers 04/15/07

4/14/2007 4:01 AM PDT BY TMZ STAFF

Don ImusIn a perfect Zone, the forthcoming sex tape from Season Two "American Idol" contestant Olivia Mojica would play out to the sounds of William Hung's "She Bangs," but for this sorry lot, a simple funeral march will suffice.

Don Imus: We had Don on last week's list, but since then, events have conspired to put him in the running for This Year's Biggest Loser. Stripped of his MSNBC simulcast and WFAN-AM syndicated morning radio show, he's now pushing the control buttons of "Imus in the Mourning." Would producer Bernie McGurk's ill-fated comments have sparked as big a furor had they been exchanged with a top-selling rap artist? You know, the kind that keeps radio parent company Viacom in the green via MTV and BET? Hard to say, but with the loss of Howard Stern and now the 66-year-old Imus, CBS Radio is suffering a serious case of jock shock.



Tom DelayTom DeLay: For the love of a combover, do we really need another he-said-she-said feud pitting a male authority figure against "The View's" Rosie O'Donnell? Apparently, indicted former Congressman DeLay thinks so. Jumping into the fray of the get-Imus bandwagon, DeLay aired out his grievances on CNN and website TownHall.com, dredging up comments from La Rosie that are ancient history. She replied with a blog item entitled "Tommy D," but we think DeLay should take his cue from perennial funny guest Bruce Willis as to what people need right now. On "The Late Show with David Letterman," while perusing a gag list of alleged female conquests handed to him by Dave, the pranking "maxi-super-megastar" confirmed he'd slept with all members of "The View," including Rosie.


Harvey WeinsteinHarvey Weinstein: The PR campaign for Miramax's "Grindhouse" started way back at the 2006 Scream Awards, with co-stars Marley Shelton, Rosario Dawson and Rose McGowan prancing lasciviously around the Pantages Theater stage. Despite months of exploitation incantation, the highly touted Miramax flick was trumped on opening weekend by... the Ice Cube family sequel "Are We Done Yet?" Is Weinstein done yet? Not quite. Although he is threatening to break up and re-release the Rodriguez and Tarantino halves as two stand-alone movies, take a hint, Harvey. The stars of today's exploitation industry are folks with names like Anna Nicole, Brad and Angelina.

Joe FrancisJoe Francis: There is no man boob flashing going on in this extended edition of "Multi-Millionaires Gone Wild." At least not yet. Based on court documents filed this week, what we do have is a Mardi Gras of anti-anxiety pills, sleep medication, alleged jail guard bribery, alleged tax evasion and teary-eyed exiting of a Florida courtroom. Francis once bellowed that U.S. District Court Judge Richard Smoak was a "judge gone wild." Thanks to perhaps as much as $20 million in alleged bogus 2002 and 2003 business expense deductions, Francis may well turn out to have been done in by "Tax Accountants Gone Wild." In the blink of a spring break girl's inebriated eye, this say-it-ain't-so-Joe has gone from pondering the menu of a planned chain of themed GGG restaurants ... to possibly sampling the taste of prison food.

David E. KelleyDavid E. Kelley: We'll admit that any guy who is married to Michelle Pfeiffer wakes up every morning a personal winner. Still, the final episode of his canned, mid-season Fox show, "The Wedding Bells," drew just 3.8 million viewers last Friday, Kelley is now struggling with the casting of the planned ABC remake of the BBC-TV series "Life on Mars." What gets us is that Kelley has had to glance across the pond for inspiration, rather than relying on a craggy corner of his prolific writer brain. It's no accident that the only show flying these days for Kelley, "Boston Legal," has one foot firmly planted in the procedural world. Maybe instead of putting Pfeiffer in his 2008 flick "Chasing Montana," Kelley should turn to a Calista Flockhart/Harrison Ford reality TV series called "Chasing Wyoming."
408 COMMENTS

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91.

trailrunner    

Lisaaa,

I don't make excuses for ills in society whether they come from the black community or white. You can ridicule me for being naive, but I think it's you who is. If you don't understand where people are coming from, you can't understand other people and how to deal with each other. Some of the ills in the black community do have to do with the institutional ills and inequity in society. There's doubt about that. However, realistically, it what it is and people have to go from where we are and most establishment black people don't want excuses, just some understanding of the obstacles they face because of past practices. You can't expect inequities to disappear just because policies change. There are a couple of 100 years of inequity in gaining power and money in the races. No excuses, just context. I simply don't blame blacks for feeling angry about racism and they have endured much, even today some people do. I don't give them a pass to situations that I don't agree with, I just simply try to understand it from their point of view, like I would like somebody to do for me. Doesn't that just make for better honesty in dealing with situations. When other people see you being fair, they will be fair too. I do know that there are many people that were exposed to the brunt of racism living that are deeply affected by those types of words, and a many of Imus's age knows that.

Also, you can refer to the other boards and I'm sure there's plenty that are vile there, too, but is that where you want to go to make your aguement, get down in the gutter. There are valid points on all sides, that's all I'm saying. My reaction is that this went too far in taking him off the air. However, I understand why some people would have no tolerance for him remaining on and it would take a lot for them to get past the words and look at the situation with a less personal reacton. Not everybody can. I certainly don't give passes though and I certainly don't want double standards. I'm not even sure we should be stifling anyone, even when we don't like them. There are better ways to fight back I think. And, I'm not on not trying to get on your case, but I call them like I see them. That's how I like to operate. Let me say, even with all the racism that blacks were subjected to within the criminal law system, and it beyond comprehensible how many injustices have been inflicted (even the Duke lacross players saw that they could have been railroaded by the system without the resources they had), but I couldn't understand them rooting for OJ Simpson to get off if he had brutally murdered those two people, which it appears that he did. I wish they would truly call them like they see them, too. I think we need to be fair when we deal with anyone else whose shoes we don't walk in. We only see the world through our own experience, but it doesn't mean it's the same for others. How can we ever relate if we're not willing to do that.

2714 days ago
92.

Em    

Neither of my parents or grandparents graduated highschool. My dad is a convicted felon. My mother was pregnant with her fist child at 17. We were periodically on food stamps throughout our childhood, and my parents never had health insurance on us. I know what it is like to stand in the gov't cheese line, and wear clothes from the Goodwill. I also know what it feels like to be looked at differently by being a "poor nobody." And I had no choice in the matter. And it wasn't fair.

I grew up and made my own decisions - - quite different from my parents. I not only graduated highschool, but I finished college with honors. It took 15 years after my HS graduation, but I pressed forward and never gave up. I had my first child at 29 (after marriage), and I've always carried insurance on myself and my family. We've never gotten public assistance either.

I'm sharing this to point out that I OVERCAME GREATER ADVERSITY THAN SOMEONE IN THIS DAY AND AGE WHO IS SIMPLY BORN BLACK. In fact, all of my black friends and white friends had more growing up than I did.

I have never portrayed myself as a victim. It wasn't fair for me to have such worthless parents, but feeling sorry for myself wasn't going to break the cycle. And getting in the line for give away programs (as my parents had done) wasn't going to break the cycle either.

So those who claim that being born black is so hard are making excuses. Does racsim still exist? Yes, it absolutely does. Will people disrespect you because of your color? Yes, they will. And people looked at me as "poor, white trash." They judged me based on my parents' decisions, so I had to work doubly hard to prove who I was. And that is what overcoming is about!

2714 days ago
93.

CosMessy Surgery    

To message 141, Lisaaa,

You can read my message number 134. I may have some typos such as you have in your message, but nothing is misspelled. I am black and I do know how to spell. By the way, you misspelled capacity!!!!

2714 days ago
94.

xyz    

trailrunner, I did read everything you had to say and while I agree with you on some points, I disagree on others. The survivor above who just posted really hit home with me. My husband WAS typical white trash growing up in Maine. His mother worked 15 hour days at a shoe factory, his father who had an 8th grade education was an alcoholic, disabled and in a wheel chair. They too stood in the cheese line and lived in Government subsidized housing and often had to resort to asistance. My huband knew that the only way out of that was with an education. He proudly served his country after graduating from college (worked 3 jobs to pay for college), went through the Officer Candidate Program and spent 23 years as a Naval Officer. Now he has his MBA and is doing quite well in private industry. Bet nobody would ever guess that his wife shares the opinions on racism that I do. The point is that my husband didn't resort to crime and crack and weed and is the last one to think of himself as a victim. Survivor made me stop and think. Your posts made me feel like you are trying to make excuses for and protect the blacks who cry racism. Yes, it would be a wonderful world if we could all see things the same and give everyone the benefit of the doubt. When OJ was acquitted the blacks were cheering the most as they felt it was finally their own victory over the white man. Yes, the Duke boys did have resources. They had resources because they were intelligent having earned thier spots at such a prestigious universtiy and they had parents who got an education and worked thier white asses off to be able to pay for the defense of their innocent sons. Blacks are still hanging on to the past and blaming it for all their current problems. Just because your great grandfather was a slave is no excuse for the trash talking, weed smoking, violent bank robbing blacks of today. My sons grandparents were considered white trash and he is doing great in graduate school at a top US University. How can you explain this?

2714 days ago
95.

xyz    

Afro, honey I'm just typing fast and not using spellcheck. It's all good. I know how to spell and using correct grammar. I'm just typing fast sugar.

2714 days ago
96.

trailrunner    

lackeylocal,

You said what I've been trying to convey. This man was a voice for all people. Everyone has lost by this tremendously and I was a regular viewer and fan (not always the case in the beginning of his career), but he evolved into one of the most potent anti-establishment voices for the people of this country - like you said, all people, and we have lost a lot. Because not everybody understood what he was about and simply bought into this cheap projection who he was by opportunists that pounced on an opportunity, this has snowballed into a tragedy, and I do mean a tragedy. The man is not replaceable out there right now. There is no one that had the platform to take on the powerful in this country and not afraid to step on toes like this man. I agree. He did much more good than not. It's too bad he gave people like this an opportunity to go after him. You can read my earlier posts on him trying to make these points, but you did it best. Thanks for that. I will defiinitely be looking for ways to get his voice heard again. For people that didn't know what he was doing and were not familiar with his show, it's a huge loss, and I agree, a very slippery slope for freedom of speech issues.

Also, afro1, thank you for your courage to be fair. I don't say everyone that takes the other position is not, not by any means, but you are exhibiting the fairness and thoughtfulness that we all need to exhibit in all situations. Thank you for that.

2714 days ago
97.

trailrunner    

Lisaaa,

Your voice is heard so much louder and clearer when you argue like this. This is rational, fair arguing, and you definitely make valid points as well.

2714 days ago
98.

CosMessy Surgery    

To 147, Lisaaa,

Please don't be presumptuous!! I am not using spellcheck either. Perhaps you should because you misspelled capacity!!! Own it up to you. You did not know how to spell it!!
By the way, my name is not honey, nor is it sugar. I am reading some thoughts, and you seem to have some unresolved anger inside of you. Have you thought of seeing someone??? If you live in Washington, DC, I could recommend a highly reputable therapist for you.

2714 days ago
99.

trailrunner    

Lisaaa,

I'm eating my last words as type these. I sent my last post, before I read your next one.

Come on now, I like the direction you were headed in. I know you have it in you to be fair. I know you do.

2714 days ago
100.

xyz    

trailrunner, I will be the first to admit that I have let my anger over the situation cloud my words. I guess I feel that Imus was used as an example and that even more than that, this case is all about money. If I thought for ONE MINUTE that Imus was a blatant racist (with respect to the comments he made about the girls basketball team), I would blast him even further because I'm not that found of Imus. I think he's opinionated and arrogant. But I truly feel that he was just doing his usual banter. I read the transcripts. He didn't even realize that what he said was going to blow sky hight. I don't think he thought about this being blown out of proportion the way it has been. When things like this happen it takes us all back and anger errupts on both sides as they defend their race. The fact is that Imus HAS paid his dues to get where he is today. Freedom of speech is a treasured part of being an American. We risk this when we make a mountain out of a molehill. But this is all about money and the sponsors pulling out fearing the impact on their own pockets. So many worse things have gone unchallenged than the recent foul words that Imus just spoke. How about that Seinfeld guy who was so blatantly racist at a comedy club. Can't think of his name right now. But that was awful and it's no secret now that that guy is truly a racist filled with hate for blacks. I don't feel that Imus is in the same category. This has all been blown out of proportion, people are taking sides defending their race. Then you have Al and Jesse jumping on board making things worse. The things I have said are horrible but at times I feel this way. Can you see where this situation has taken all of us back?

2714 days ago
101.

Em    

I had a black friend tell me something years ago that really resonated with me. She said, "I don't get public assistance, so my business isn't a public matter."

There is a sea of difference in COMMANDING respect instead of DEMANDING respect. And perhaps the biggest reward is the quality life you will have.

No one who meets me today would believe my background (read my earlier post). In fact, the few whom I've shared this with were in complete shock. I have overcome that life. It is truly in the past, so I know if I can - others can to. It just takes the willingness to use others' negativity as fuel. Everything is not a race issue; sometimes it's just a people issue.

2714 days ago
102.

Marcy    

This Picture Is very scary!!!

2714 days ago
103.

Sebastian    


To the FOOLS that think it,s about color or race

" IT,S ABOUT YOUR HEATHEN LIFE STYLE"

2714 days ago
104.

xyz    

And the worst part of what Imus said is that it was directed at young, impressionable black females who are in college getting an education and doing thier part to make the world a better place. Shame on him for that. Firing him was like killing an ant with a baseball bat. I can guarantee that not only do I hate the things I said, but I can assure you that the blacks on these posts also don't mean the hateful things they said. Ones comments ignite the anger in another. Everything is lost in defense of our own race. I stand by my opinion that it's the ovekill of this that has people spewing hate at each other.

2714 days ago
105.

Hal    

Lisaaa, I agree with your posts. If everyone, and I mean everyone, would work to become an asset to this country and NOT a liability (as so many are), things would improve. Improve your standards, have pride in yourself, work for your money, and for heaven's sake lose the attitude!

Sharpton and Jackson are troublemakers, and most blacks seem to know that. Think for yourself and tell the "revs" to shut up.

Stop feeling sorry for yourself and thinking the country owes you something: I have never owned a slave; you have never been one! Grow up, and pull your pants up while you're at it.



2714 days ago
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