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MIchael Jackson/Wade Robson

You Be the Judge

5/18/2013 12:10 PM PDT BY TMZ STAFF

0517-wade-robson-michael-jacksonWade Robson now insists Michael Jackson molested him, although lots of people think he's lying through his teeth.  So we gotta ask ...

Wade Robson

  • Truthful
  • Big fat liar

Michael Jackson -- pedophile?

  • Yes
  • No

Wade should have his day in court

  • Yes
  • No

Repressed memory

  • Legit
  • BS

Wade's motives

  • Justice
  • Money

My memory of MJ

  • Great talent
  • Child molester

If Michael had lived ...

  • Total vindication
  • Prisoner #321487

More demons

  • Michael
  • Elvis

More demons

  • Michael
  • Whitney
`

159 COMMENTS

No Avatar
61.

Kamcy    

On the Wade pole the question on repressed memory should have clarified whether it is repressed memories in general or Wade's repressed memory. I believe in repressed memories but I don't believe molestation was a repressed memory for Wade.

340 days ago
62.

Kathy    

Wade already had his day in court in 2005.

340 days ago
63.

Cris     

Ese robson, es un maldito hijo de perra buscador de dinero y fama, ojala que la vida haga justicia con esa basura. Tuvo la suerte de estar al lado de una persona espectacular, humanitaria, talentosa, bondadosa y por un poco de dinero se vende. El bien siempre triunfara soble el mal. Viva Michael carajoooooooo

340 days ago
64.

Cris     

Ese robson, es un maldito hijo de perra buscador de dinero y fama, ojala que la vida haga justicia con esa basura. Tuvo la suerte de estar al lado de una persona espectacular, humanitaria, talentosa, bondadosa y por un poco de dinero se vende. El bien siempre triunfara soble el mal. Viva Michael carajoooooooo

340 days ago
65.

Cris     

Ese robson, es un maldito hijo de perra buscador de dinero y fama, ojala que la vida haga justicia con esa basura. Tuvo la suerte de estar al lado de una persona espectacular, humanitaria, talentosa, bondadosa y por un poco de dinero se vende. El bien siempre triunfara soble el mal. Viva Michael carajoooooooo

340 days ago
66.

Jeff    

Well, he either lied under oath in his denial of being molested by MJ, or he's lying now. Either way, his testimony is now not credible, and should not be allowed to bring suit against MJ's estate. Furthermore, when other victims were suing while MJ was alive, it was in part Wade Robeson's testimony that helped MJ win against his victims. Now that MJ is dead, and the victims got nothing but a hefty layer's bill, Robeson now wants to sue? If his lawsuit is allowed, then the MJ estate should counter sue on the grounds of him being a liar, slander, and Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress. If he's got any sense at all, he'd better walk away from this one now. As it stands, he could be sued for defamation and slander; and in deed should be. The victims suing MJ and lost, should sue Robeson for lying under oath back then, which helped cause them to lose. Robeson should be prosecuted for lying under oath, and as a result, obstructing justice. He really needs to shut up and walk away, and continue to pretend nothing happened, and hope nobody brings a suit against him.

340 days ago
67.

HumanNature    

Siggisis


WHY DON'T YOU PUT UP THE LINK TO THIS "BS" THAT YOU POSTED?????

340 days ago
68.

gayforliztaylor    

Why were Jordan Chandler (videotaped on Jackson's lap), Gavin Arvizo & other 13 year olds in his bed with him but Paris, Lisa Marie & Debbie Rowe were not allowed in his bed with him from 1998 through 2009? Lisa Marie lived in another city after they married?

340 days ago
69.

Bruce    

Same as the 2005 trial, once the media frenzy is on, it is easy for the public to conclude that MIchael is a pedophile by just of course basing information on what stories are written and reported in the media. Behind all these ping-pong banter of he says he says, there are FACTS that money is behind these. To those who are honestly familiar with the FACTS, this maid who now is out again to tell her stories, was paid $20,000 by Hard Copy in the 90's in exchange of saying made up stories against Michael.

I am one of those who have have read the 2005 trial court transcripts and the FBI files of the loooong account of their spying on MJ for more than a decade.

340 days ago
70.

emme    

Wow...someone must have hacked the results of the polling....for the last several days the polls said the majority of people thought he was a pedophile...now it says on 33% do. Those MJ fans are cray cray.

340 days ago
71.

Pegasus    

AEG execs face questions about Michael Jackson's death

By Alan Duke, CNN

updated 10:38 AM EDT, Mon May 20, 2013


The death in 2009 of superstar Michael Jackson, who died of cardiac arrest at the age of 50, sent shockwaves around the world. The death in 2009 of superstar Michael Jackson, who died of cardiac arrest at the age of 50, sent shockwaves around the world.

The Jackson 5 perform on a TV show circa 1969. From left, Tito Jackson, Marlon Jackson, Michael Jackson, Jackie Jackson and Jermaine Jackson.

Michael Jackson quickly became the stand out star of the Jackson 5. Here he performs onstage circa 1970.

Michael Jackson poses during a portrait session in Los Angeles in 1971.

Michael Jackson performs with The Jacksons in New Orleans on October 3, 1979.

Jackson achieved superstardom with his solo career in the 1980s. Here Jackson is shown on stage in Kansas in 1983.

Michael Jackson performs on stage circa 1990.

Jackson broke a world record during the Bad tour in 1988 when 504,000 people attending seven sold-out shows at Wembley Stadium in London.

Jackson perfoms in concert circa 1991 in New York City.

Known for his dance moves, Jackson is seen here jumping in the air while performing during the Dangerous tour in 1992.

Michael Jackson performs in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Jackson performs with his brothers.

Jackson performs during the Bad tour at Wembley Stadium in London.

Jackson performs during the taping of "American Bandstand's 50th: A Celebration" in 2002.

Michael Jackson earned the Legend Award during the MTV Video Music Awards in Tokyo in 2006.

HIDE CAPTION


Michael Jackson, King of Pop

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
AEG Live's top lawyer will testify as trial's 4th week begins
Jackson lawyer will question AEG Live general counsel about negotiations with Dr. Murray
AEG Live's controller confirms the company budgeted $1.5 million to pay for Michael Jackson's doctor
An AEG expert testifies the promoter should have seen "a red flag" when Murray asked for $5 million

Los Angeles (CNN) -- AEG Live filed an insurance claim to recover losses from Michael Jackson's death the same day he died, according to a lawyer for Jackson's family.

That revelation may not relate to the heart of the wrongful death lawsuit against Michael Jackson's last concert promoter, but Jackson lawyers hope it could sway jurors to see AEG Live executives as motivated by money over the pop icon's needs.

It is one of many points Jackson lawyers will try to make Monday when they call AEG Live's top lawyer to the witness stand as the trial's fourth week begins in a Los Angeles courtroom.

Jackson's mother and three children contend AEG Live is liable in the singer's death because its executives negligently hired, retained or supervised Dr. Conrad Murray, who was convicted of involuntary manslaughter.


Katherine Jackson: Michael's mother, 82, was deposed for nine hours over three days by AEG Live lawyers. As the guardian of her son's three children, she is a plaintiff in the wrongful death lawsuit against the company that promoted Michael Jackson's comeback concerts.


Prince Jackson: Michael's oldest son is considered a key witness in the Jacksons' case against AEG Live, since he is expected to testify about what his father told him about the concert promoter in the last days of his life. Prince, who turned 16 in February, is becoming more independent -- he now has a driver's license and jobs.


Paris Jackson: Michael's daughter, who turns 15 on April 3, is on the list of witnesses and was questioned by AEG Live lawyers for several hours on March 21 about her father's death. Paris is an outspoken teen who often posts messages to her 1 million-plus Twitter followers.


Blanket Jackson: Although AEG Live asked the judge to order Blanket, 11, to sit for a deposition, and he is one of the four plaintiffs suing them, Michael's youngest son will not be a witness in the trial. His doctor submitted a note to the court saying it would be "medically detrimental" to the child.


Kevin Boyle: The Los Angeles personal injury lawyer is leading the Jackson team of at least six attorneys in the wrongful death suit against AEG Live. One of his notable cases was a large settlement with Boeing on behalf of two soldiers injured when their helicopter malfunctioned and crashed in Iraq.


Perry Sanders, Jr.: Katherine Jackson's personal lawyer is helping steer the Jackson matriarch through her relations with her son's estate, probate court and the wrongful death suit. He is also known for representing the family of Biggie Smalls in their suit against the city of Los Angeles over the rapper's death investigation.


Marvin Putnam: He's the lead lawyer for AEG Live, defending against the wrongful death suit. The primary focus of his legal practice is "media in defense of their First Amendment rights," according to his official biography.


Philip Anschutz: The billionaire owner of AEG, parent company of AEG Live, is on the Jacksons' witness list. He is the force behind the effort to build a football stadium in downtown Los Angeles to lure a National Football League team to the city. He recently pulled his company off the market after trying to sell it for $8 billion.


Tim Leiweke: He was recently fired as AEG's president as Philip Anschutz announced he was taking a more active role in the company. The Jackson lawyers say Leiweke's e-mail exchanges with executives under him concerning Michael Jackson's health are important evidence in their case.


Joe Jackson: Michael's father, 84, is on the witness list for the trial and may testify. The Jackson family patriarch, who lives in Las Vegas separately from his wife, has suffered several ministrokes in the last year, which some close to him say have affected him.


Randy Phillips: He's president of AEG Live, the concert promoter that contracted with Michael Jackson for his "This Is It" comeback shows set to start in London in July 2009. The Jackson lawsuit says Phillips supervised Dr. Conrad Murray's treatment of Jackson in the weeks before his death, making the company liable for damages. E-mails between Phillips and other executives showed they were worried about Jackson's missed rehearsals and sought Murray's help getting him ready.


Paul Gongaware: The AEG Live co-CEO worked closely with Michael Jackson as he prepared for his comeback concerts. He testified at Dr. Conrad Murray's criminal trial that he contacted the physician and negotiated his hiring at the request of Jackson. AEG lawyers say it was Jackson who chose, hired and supervised Murray. Gongaware knew Jackson well, having been tour manager for the singer in previous years.


Kenny Ortega: He was chosen by Michael Jackson and AEG Live to direct and choreograph the "This Is It" shows. Ortega, who choreographed for Jackson's "Dangerous" and "HIStory" tours, testified at Dr. Conrad Murray's criminal trial that "Jackson was frail" at a rehearsal days before his death.


Dr. Conrad Murray: He was Michael Jackson's personal physician in the two months before his death, giving him nightly infusions of the surgical anesthetic that the coroner ruled led to his death. Murray, who is appealing his involuntary manslaughter conviction, has sworn that he would invoke his Fifth Amendment protection from self-incrimination and refused to testify in the civil trial. There is a chance that Murray will be brought into court from jail to testify outside the presence of the jury to allow the judge to determine if he would be ordered to testify.


John Branca: He's one of two executors of Michael Jackson's estate. Branca was Jackson's lawyer until about seven years before his death. He said Jackson rehired him just weeks before he died.



The promoters ignored a series of red flags that should have warned them Jackson was in danger as he was pressured to get ready for his comeback concerts, the Jackson lawsuit claims.

Jackson manager's e-mails found, could be key in AEG trial

AEG Live lawyers counter that it was Jackson who chose, hired and supervised Murray, and that he was responsible for his own bad decisions. Its executives could not be expected to know Murray was using the surgical anesthetic propofol, the drug the coroner ruled killed him, to treat his insomnia, they argue.

Jackson lead lawyer Brian Panish will question AEG Live general counsel Shawn Trell about his company's negotiations with Murray to be Jackson's personal physician for his "This Is It" shows in London.

The doctor signed the contract prepared by AEG lawyers and sent it back to the company a day before Jackson's death. The company argues it was not an executed contract because their executives and Michael Jackson never signed it.

The Jackson lawyers argue that e-mails, budget do***ents and the fact that the doctor was already working for two months showed a binding agreement between AEG and Murray.

Panish, speaking outside of the courtroom Friday, said he would also ask Trell about AEG's insurance claim, which he said his team recently discovered was filed with Lloyds of London on June 25, 2009, hours after Jackson was pronounced dead at UCLA Medical Center.

Wade Robson calls Michael Jackson 'a pedophile'

A Lloyds of London underwriter later sued AEG, claiming the company failed to disclose information about the pop star's health and drug use. AEG dropped its claim for a $17.5 million insurance policy last year.

Monday's court will start with AEG Live controller Julie Hollander completing her testimony about the company's budgeting, which she acknowledged included $1.5 million approved to pay Murray. The doctor's costs were listed as production costs, expenses that AEG is responsible for paying, and not as an advance, which Jackson would ultimately be responsible for giving back to the company, she testified.

The controller's testimony appears to contradict the argument AEG lead lawyer Marvin Putnam made in a CNN interview days before the trial began.

Choreographer: AEG considered pulling plug on comeback

AEG Live's role with Murray was only to "forward" money owed to him by Jackson, just as a patient would use their "MasterCard," Putnam said. "If you go to your doctor and you pay with a credit card, obviously MasterCard in that instance, depending on your credit card, is providing the money to that doctor for services until you pay it back. Now, are you telling them MasterCard in some measure in that instance, did MasterCard hire the doctor or did you? Well, clearly you did. I think the analogy works in this instance."

Jackson lawyers played video testimony of one of AEG's own expert witnesses Friday -- 25-year veteran tour manager Marty Hom.

The opinion Hom submitted for AEG concluded he saw no red flags that should have alerted the promoter that something was wrong with Murray.

He was asked if AEG Live should have realized something was wrong when Murray initially asked for $5 million a year to work as Jackson's personal physician. "That raised a red flag because of the enormous sum of money," Hom testified.

Hom acknowledged he had not seen many of the do***ents and depositions in the case, and AEG was considering him for a job as the Rollings Stones tour manager at the same time he was asked to testify.

340 days ago
72.

Dose Of Reality    

But what about all the adult female humans Michael was involved with?

339 days ago
73.

Pegasus    


Jackson concert director worked without contract

May 20, 2013, 7:16 PM EST

By ANTHONY McCARTNEY , AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A corporate attorney for AEG Live LLC says Michael Jackson's doctor was not the only person working on the singer's ill-fated "This Is It" tour without a fully executed contract.

AEG General Counsel Shawn Trell told a Los Angeles jury on Monday that the tour's director Kenny Ortega was being paid based on an agreement laid out solely in emails.

Jackson's mother is trying to show AEG was negligent in hiring Conrad Murray, the doctor later convicted of involuntary manslaughter in connection with Jackson's June 2009 death.

Michael Jackson died before signing a $150,000 a month contract for Murray to serve as his doctor on the "This Is It" tour.

AEG's attorneys say Jackson's signature was required to finalize Murrays' contract.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

Do***ents prepared by a concert promoter that were detailed in court on Monday indicated the company had budgeted $150,000 a month for a doctor to treat Michael Jackson as he prepared and delivered a series of comeback shows.

However, Jackson died of an anesthetic overdose before he signed the agreement, and no payments were made to Dr. Conrad Murray by AEG Live LLC, testimony and the records show.

The do***ents were presented by lawyers for Katherine Jackson, the singer's mother as they attempt to show an employment relationship existed between Murray and AEG.

Katherine Jackson is suing AEG, claiming it was negligent in hiring Murray and that it missed numerous red flags about the singer's health before he died.

Murray was later convicted of involuntary manslaughter after he administered a fatal dose of a powerful anesthetic to the singer.

AEG denies it hired Murray and says it bears no liability for Jackson's death. Attorneys for the company have said Jackson concealed his addiction to propofol, the drug that killed him

Julie Hollander, a vice president and controller of event operations for AEG Live, testified Monday that Murray's contract was the only one she had ever seen that required approval by an artist for services on a tour.

She believed Jackson's signature was required because of the personal nature of the doctor's services.

In total, Murray was projected to receive $1.5 million in payments over the first few months of the "This Is It" shows.

Hollander was the first AEG executive to testify in the lawsuit. The company's general counsel Shawn Trell began testifying later in the day.

Panish questioned Trell about a July letter sent to Jackson's estate asking for more than $30 million in reimbursement, including $300,000 for Murray's services.

Trell said it was a mistake to include Murray's payments as production costs.

Hollander also testified that Jackson was responsible for 95 percent of production expenses if his comeback shows were canceled.

The budget do***ents showed the company had spent $24 million producing the concerts through October 2009, roughly three months after the singer's death. The production was more than $2 million over budget, the records show.

In recent years, AEG has received 10 percent of the proceeds from the film "This Is It" that was released after the death of Jackson.

339 days ago
74.

Marina    

I think Wade Robson is a liar. Before he, his mother and his sister took advantage of Michael. Now he has decided to re-earn some dollars back to Michael. Wade Robson is a hypocrite and a liar. In 2005 he gave convincing evidence in favor of Michael. Now, suddenly remembered that he was abused.

339 days ago
75.

Pegasus    

Lawyer: Michael Jackson’s doctor not only person working on ill-fated tour without contract


(Joel Ryan, file/ Associated Press ) - FILE - In this March 5, 2009 file photo, Michael Jackson announces several concerts at the London O2 Arena in July, at a press conference at the London O2 Arena. An AEG Live accounting executive testified Monday, May 20, 2013, in a Los Angeles courtroom that the company spent $24 million on preparations for Jackson’s ill-fated “This Is It” shows, however never paid the singer’s personal doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter because a fully-signed agreement was never obtained.

(Joel Ryan, file/ Associated Press ) - FILE - In this March 5, 2009 file photo, Michael Jackson announces several concerts at the London O2 Arena in July, at a press conference at the London O2 Arena. An AEG Live accounting executive testified Monday, May 20, 2013, in a Los Angeles courtroom that the company spent $24 million on preparations for Jackson’s ill-fated “This Is It” shows, however never paid the singer’s personal doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter because a fully-signed agreement was never obtained.
(Kevin Mazur, AEG/Getty Images, File/ Associated Press ) - FILE - In this June 23, 2009 handout photo provided by AEG, pop star Michael Jackson rehearses at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. An AEG Live accounting executive testified Monday, May 20, 2013, in a Los Angeles courtroom that the company spent $24 million on preparations for Jackson’s ill-fated “This Is It” shows, however never paid the singer’s personal doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter because a fully-signed agreement was never obtained.

By Associated Press,


Updated: Monday, May 20, 5:07 PM

LOS ANGELES — Michael Jackson’s doctor was not the only person working on the singer’s ill-fated “This Is It” tour without a fully executed contract, a corporate attorney for concert promoter AEG Live LLC testified Monday.

The tour’s director Kenny Ortega was being paid based on an agreement laid out solely in emails, AEG General Counsel Shawn Trell told jurors.

Jackson’s mother is trying to show AEG was negligent in hiring Conrad Murray, the doctor who was later convicted of involuntary manslaughter in Jackson’s June 2009 death.

Katherine Jackson claims AEG failed to properly investigate Murray before hiring him to serve as her son’s tour physician, and that the company missed or ignored red flags about the singer’s health before his death. AEG denies it hired Murray.

In court, attorneys for Katherine Jackson displayed emails sent a month before the death of her son in which Murray’s contract terms were laid out.

Trell said those emails did not demonstrate an employment relationship — a key element of the case that will be decided by a jury of six men and six women.

Trell acknowledged, however, that Ortega was paid for his work on the shows despite working under terms laid out only in a series of emails.

“Kenny Ortega is different from Conrad Murray,” Trell testified.

Michael Jackson died before signing a $150,000 a month contract for Murray to serve as his doctor on the “This Is It” tour. AEG’s attorneys say Jackson’s signature was required to finalize Murrays’ contract.

An email displayed in court showed Murray’s contract terms. Other do***ents indicated AEG budgeted $300,000 to pay Murray for his work with Jackson in May and June of 2009.

Another email said executive Paul Gongaware informed others that Murray would be “full time” on the tour by mid-May.

Plaintiff’s attorney Brian Panish asked Trell to agree with a statement that Murray was working for AEG.

“I would totally disagree with that statement,” Trell said, noting that Ortega and Murray were considered independent contractors.

Trell was the second AEG executive to testify in the trial, which is entering its fourth week. AEG attorneys have yet to question him.

He also testified that the company obtained an insurance policy that covered the possible cancellation of some of the “This Is It” shows after a physician evaluated the singer.

Trell testified that five days before Jackson’s death, top AEG executives were informed the singer was in poor health. By that point, Ortega had sent executives an email titled “Trouble at the front” detailing Jackson’s problems.

“There are strong signs of paranoia, anxiety, and obsessive-like behavior,” Ortega wrote to AEG Live CEO Randy Phillips. Jackson’s symptoms were reminiscent of behavior that led to the cancellation of an HBO concert earlier in the decade. Ortega wrote.

339 days ago
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