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Joe Jackson

Suffers a Stroke

11/29/2012 1:30 PM PST BY TMZ STAFF
breaking news

1129_joe_jackson_tmz_Article
Joe Jackson
has suffered a stroke -- and is currently being treated at a hospital.

A source close to the family tells TMZ, Michael Jackson's father suffered a "mini-stroke" last night. He was transported to a hospital, where he's still being treated.

Details surrounding the medical emergency are unclear, as well as how serious the actual stroke was.

Last time we saw Joe, he was in good spirits in Las Vegas, where he proudly showed off the gun he carries around in his jacket.

Story developing ...

 1129_joe_jackson_stroke_footer

125 COMMENTS

No Avatar
47.

CloBird    

I wonder if he has suffered a stroke before-- this could explain some of his mental lapses.

630 days ago
48.

Destiny Equality    

you reap what you sew... the older you get the more eviler you are its just a fact

630 days ago
49.

Kingces    

STAY STRAPED JOE THE DOCTORS ARE AFTER YOUR MONEY

630 days ago
50.

Luz    

WT
I totally agree with you. It was Joe who had the vision, and made it all happen from a place where he had no money, and no connections to the music world! In a time where black singers were kept marginated, he developed his children's talents knocked doors until they made it! He saved his children from a drug ridden neighborhood. It's because of him The Jacksons exist!

630 days ago
51.

Brigha from UK    

Luz. I totally agree with your rational and balanced comments.
In addition, I'd like to add that the demonisation of Joe by the media is almost equal to that endured by Michael. You'd think the fans could be more understanding.
Yes, he wasn't a perfect parent, but who is?

630 days ago
52.

She's baaaack    

Big F'n deal. He had a TIA. Unfortunately since he got emergency treatment the big one was probably warded off. For that Joe should be thankful because he should try to live as long as possible because there's a place in hell reserved for him.

630 days ago
53.

RAQUEL DE DEUS     

SE CUIDA , JOE JACKSON !!

630 days ago
54.

Pegasus    

HAPPY BIRTHDAY THRILLER- 'Thriller' at 30: How One Album Changed the World
"Thriller" conquered racial divides and evolving platforms at MTV, radio

MJJ Productions


But "Thriller's" legacy goes far beyond its own sales and awards accomplishments. Once MTV found success with Michael Jackson, videos by other black performers quickly appeared on the playlist. This development single-handedly forced pop radio to reintroduce black music into its mix: After all, pop fans, now accustomed to seeing black artists and white artists on the same video channel, came to expect the same mix of music on pop radio. It was impossible to keep the various fragments of the audience isolated from one another any longer. Mass-appeal Top 40 radio itself made a big comeback due to this seismic shift. Beginning in early 1983 in Philadelphia, and rapidly spreading through the country, one or more FM stations in every city switched to Top 40 and many rose to the top of the ratings playing the mix of music made popular by MTV-young rock and urban hits.

In the age of "Thriller," black music made a resounding comeback on the pop charts. If 1982 was the genre's low point in terms of pop success, by 1985 more than one third of all the hits on the Billboard Hot 100 were of urban radio origin. Even Prince's "1999" single, shut out of pop radio upon its initial release in 1982, was re-launched in mid-1983 and off the back of its belated MTV exposure became a huge pop radio success the second time around. Thus, in a way few historians appreciate, the Michael Jackson/MTV team proved itself a remarkably progressive force, helping to reintegrate a fragmented popular culture at the dawn of the Reagan era. Black music was back at the center at the mainstream, and to this day it has never again been pushed from the spotlight.

As an aside, the rise of MTV conversely spelled doom for country music's fortunes in the pop world. Prior to MTV, country music had, since the early 70's, become increasingly strong at pop radio, with its popularity culminating in the summer of 1981, during the "Urban Cowboy" craze, just as MTV was being launched. That summer, there were an average of 11 country records on the Billboard Hot 100 in any given week. But MTV decided from day-one that country music would not be part of its programming and country's performance at pop radio steadily nosedived from that point onward. Soon, country records were completely shut out of the Hot 100, something that had never happened before.

For all its record-setting accomplishments, the thing which never ceases to amaze me is that Michael Jackson pulled off what is perhaps the rarest trick in any field: After more than a decade of being an absolutely huge superstar, top of his field, sure-thing Hall of Famer, etc., he somehow found an extra gear and suddenly transcended mere superstardom, redefining the very notion of how big someone in his field could be. Try imagining J.K. Rowling suddenly coming out with a series of books that were so much better and more popular than the Harry Potter books that they rendered them a mere footnote to her career and you'll get the idea of what Michael Jackson accomplished with "Thriller."

Newsweek's prediction just six month earlier that no new mass-appeal superstar would ever again emerge had proven spectacularly wrong, and for the time being, rock's doldrums had been cured. Robert Christgau proclaimed that 1984 was the greatest year for pop singles since the height of Beatlemania, crediting the revival of Top 40 radio and the integration of MTV for this development. And lest there be any doubt that "Thriller" truly did unify all corners of the pop audience, it's worth noting that it won the hipper-than-thou Village Voice critics' poll for album of the year in addition to all those Grammys.

Predictably, the death of Michael Jackson caused a lamentation about the impossibility of anyone ever doing it again. Shortly after Jackson's death The New York Times editorialized: "Fame on the the level Mr. Jackson has achieved is all but impossible for pop culture heroes today, and quite likely it will never be possible again." The similarity of these remarks to Newsweek's 1982 incorrect prediction is uncanny. The notion that never again will the conditions be right for a truly mass, sustainable musical moment is myopic, to say the least.

Despite a succession of on-line platforms that assume ever more fragmented audience niches, one would be foolish to bet against the potential for one to arise that encourages audience behavior which favors a vast coalition of sub-groups uniting behind something new and fantastic. Besides, pop music has always thrived on mass excitement; the yearning for shared cultural touchpoints seems to be hardwired into us. What "Thriller" taught us was that the right star, with the right product and the right technological environment, always has the ability to move us and to unite us all.

Happy 30th anniversary, "Thriller." No doubt the next big thing is just around the corner.

(Page 2 of 4)

History has been unkind to early MTV's exclusion of black music from its format, but this is somewhat unfair. Launched at the height of radio playlist segregation, the channel at first could not fathom the idea that its target audience--teens in the overwhelmingly white suburbs and small towns who were the first to receive MTV on their cable television systems in late 1981 -- would want to hear black records, with which they were unfamiliar. In a world without mass appeal Top 40 radio, the idea of mass appeal Top 40 video was far from obvious. But at least on the radio dial, there were choices for those who wanted to seek out black music. On television, MTV was the only game in town. And its power to steer pop tastes was quickly becoming apparent, as hits began to gather steam in the hinterlands simply due to MTV exposure, without any radio play.

MTV's true impact was not fully felt until the channel made its debut on cable systems in the New York and Los Angeles areas in September of 1982. Suddenly, that which had been a rumor wafting in from the heartland became a loud thunderclap waking up the cultural agenda setters in the nation's twin media capitals, who accurately hyped MTV as the Next Big Thing. It is no coincidence that the aforementioned nadir of black music's presence on the pop charts occurred in October, 1982 -- a moment when all of pop radio and the only music channel on television excluded it from the mix.

Enter Michael Jackson. By the time he delivered "Thriller" to CBS's Epic label in 1982, Jackson had been one of the top recording stars in the world for over a dozen years, both with and without his brothers. However, his most recent album, the mega-hit "Off The Wall," which spawned four Top 10 singles, had been released in 1979, a year when 40% of the songs that reached the Top 3 on the Hot 100 were by black artists, before the wall separating black and white music on the radio arose.

"The Girls Is Mine"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CBS Records was well aware that there were no black records at all in the pop Top 20 the week they sent the debut single from "Thriller" to radio in October of 1982. Faced with the very real possibility that Jackson's record would fail to become exposed to a crossover radio audience, the record company took no chances. That first single, "The Girl Is Mine," was a gentle, easy-listening leaning duet with the ex-Beatle Paul McCartney, most recently Stevie Wonder's duet partner. The presence of McCartney, still very much a pop radio mainstay in the early 80's, virtually insured the song's acceptance at white radio. And, aware that MTV didn't play videos by black artists, CBS simply didn't make one for Jackson's first single from "Thriller."

"The Girl Is Mine" debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 6th, 1982, the date on which, not coincidentally, the rebound of black music's presence on that chart began, after a three-year steady decline. The fluffy single was not well received by critics. "Michael's worst idea since 'Ben,'" was how Robert Christgau, writing in the Village Voice, judged it. For an album that not long after would be viewed as a masterpiece, this was an inauspicious beginning, although it did get on white radio as intended.

The "Thriller" album itself was released three weeks later, November 30th, and on the chart dated December 25th it debuted at No. 11. This was a highly respectable chart debut in those pre-Soundscan days, although unexceptional, as even back then it was not unheard of for albums to debut inside the Top 10 or even at No. 1. In January, the album inched into the Top 10, moving to No. 9 for two weeks, then No. 8, before stalling for three weeks at No. 5, which was as far as the momentum generated by "The Girl Is Mine" would take it. While the album could already be considered a hit, "Thriller's" chart performance in those early weeks gave no hint of the juggernaut it would turn out to be.

On the strength of the No. 2 pop chart peak of "The Girl Is Mine" just after Christmas, CBS Records knew their strategy to lead at radio with the McCartney "Trojan Horse" was a success. As 1983 began, the label prepared its campaign for the album's second single, the more "urban" sounding "Billie Jean." With the table already set, pop radio immediately started to play this follow-up single, and skeptics were indeed happy to find that "Thriller" had more thrilling things to offer than the McCartney duet. "Billie Jean" was nothing short of breathtaking, the kind of single that makes you stop in your tracks and always remember where you were when you first heard it. But with MTV the rage of the music world that winter, there was no way Jackson could occupy the central spot in pop culture without its support. And MTV didn't play black records.

CBS gambled and filmed expensive videos for both "Billie Jean" and the next single, "Beat It"--videos that were a joy to behold. Jackson was a natural video star, his era's premiere song and dance man. The two videos introduced a standard of choreography previously unseen in music videos, arguably surpassing even James Brown's 1960...s live work, until then the gold standard against whom all R&B dancers were judged.

As a visual art form, music video is naturally suited to choreography. Yet with the exception of Toni Basil's "Mickey" clip from the previous fall, there really hadn't been any accomplished dancing featured in videos shown on MTV. This was largely due to the fact that the music business hadn't in recent years nurtured artists who could dance-even the stars of disco music weren't consummate dancers themselves. All that would eventually change after "Thriller," with the coming of Madonna, Michael's sister Janet, and Paula Abdul, among others. But in the meantime, Michael Jackson had the MTV dance-floor to himself

Despite the obvious quality of the Jackson videos, MTV initially resisted playing them, claiming it was a rock station and Jackson didn't fit the format. There is to this day some disagreement as to what led the channel to change its policy and add "Billie Jean." At the time, a story was widely circulated that CBS chief Walter Yetnikoff resorted to threatening to pull all of his label's videos off the channel if MTV didn't play "Billie Jean," but this claim has been refuted over the years by original MTV honchos Bob Pittman and Les Garland. They concede that the channel initially assumed it would not play the video, as its thumping beat and urban production did not fit the channel's "rock" image. They contend however that in mid-February, after seeing the clip--which was possibly the best that had ever come across their desks--they began to re-think things. Coupled with the fact that even without MTV, the song had just leaped in one week from No. 23 to No. 6 on the Hot 100, the MTV execs concluded they should give it a shot.

"Billie Jean"

"Beat It"

"Thriller"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


MTV's -- and Jackson's -- timing was perfect. MTV debuted "Billie Jean," on March 1st, just four days before the song hit No. 1 on the Hot 100, making it the first uptempo urban song to accomplish that feat in over two years. Simultaneously, "Billie Jean's" momentum was the thing that finally pulled the "Thriller" album all the way up to No. 1 on the album chart in its 10th chart week. But a number one single and album turned out to be only the beginning-for both Jackson and MTV.

Featuring Jackson's videos for "Billie Jean" and two weeks later for "Beat It" widened the video-clip channel's appeal as much as airplay on MTV widened the appeal of Michael Jackson. MTV was already at the white-hot center of the pop universe, but it was only when they added Michael Jackson that they found their real star. The idea of the hottest pop star in the world being shown on TV throughout the day-between the two clips, you didn't need to sit in front of your TV for very long to catch Michael on MTV-made the network even more talked-about than before. New viewers watched MTV because they'd heard how great the Michael Jackson videos were; at the same time, MTVs core audience was blown away by videos featuring a type of music they weren't supposed to like-except it turned out they did. To use a modern term to describe what was happening back then, MTV and Michael Jackson made each other go viral.

Jackson's second MTV video, for "Beat It," was yet another master stroke, incorporating live sound effects, real L.A. street gang members and the mass choreographed dancing which would become a signature part of Jackson's videos. The "Billie Jean" video had been a revelation because it showcased the brilliance of Jackson's performance. "Beat It" did that too, but it also set a new standard of production for music video itself, and in fact it became the more popular and acclaimed video of the two, despite the fact that "Billie Jean" was a bigger hit song. "Beat It" also represented another step in Jackson's master plan to appeal across all musical boundaries, with its rock feel and Eddie van Halen guitar solo. It achieved that goal, being played on rock radio stations and earning Jackson yet another category of fans that would not otherwise have gravitated to his music (In this regard Michael Jackson was actually beaten to the punch by his older brother Jermaine, who featured the new wave band Devo on his 1982 hit "Let Me Tickle Your Fancy," which had also garnered some rock airplay) .

Then, just when it didn't seem possible that Jackson could get any bigger, he did. On May 16th, with "Beat It" at No. 1 and "Billie Jean" still in the Top 10, Michael debuted the moonwalk on the Motown 25th Anniversary TV special on NBC. Drawn by a desire to see Michael Jackson's first performance on a stage since the release of "Thriller," 47 million Americans tuned in, many of whom did not yet have cable television and thus could not see Jackson's videos on MTV. The performance Jackson gave that night hurled his career even further into the stratosphere.

A full year after "Thriller's" release, after the record-setting seven Top 10 singles and countless weeks at No. 1 on the album chart, making it the best-selling album of all time, Jackson still had one more trick up his "Thriller" sleeve: On December 2nd, he debuted his nearly 14-minute John Landis-directed video for the album's title track. It was immediately acclaimed as perhaps the greatest music video ever made and it reignited Michael-mania. A commercial videocassette featuring the short film shot to the top of the video chart and went on to become the biggest selling music video of all time. Meanwhile, the "Thriller" album, which had fallen out of the No. 1 position nearly six months earlier, now jumped back into the top spot just in time for Christmas and stayed there well into the new year. The Grammy telecast two months later, during which Jackson won eight Grammys, served as the formal coronation of Jackson as King of Pop, although now by that point the fact was obvious.

But "Thriller's" legacy goes far beyond its own sales and awards accomplishments. Once MTV found success with Michael Jackson, videos by other black performers quickly appeared on the playlist. This development single-handedly forced pop radio to reintroduce black music into its mix: After all, pop fans, now accustomed to seeing black artists and white artists on the same video channel, came to expect the same mix of music on pop radio. It was impossible to keep the various fragments of the audience isolated from one another any longer. Mass-appeal Top 40 radio itself made a big comeback due to this seismic shift. Beginning in early 1983 in Philadelphia, and rapidly spreading through the country, one or more FM stations in every city switched to Top 40 and many rose to the top of the ratings playing the mix of music made popular by MTV-young rock and urban hits.

But "Thriller's" legacy goes far beyond its own sales and awards accomplishments. Once MTV found success with Michael Jackson, videos by other black performers quickly appeared on the playlist. This development single-handedly forced pop radio to reintroduce black music into its mix: After all, pop fans, now accustomed to seeing black artists and white artists on the same video channel, came to expect the same mix of music on pop radio. It was impossible to keep the various fragments of the audience isolated from one another any longer. Mass-appeal Top 40 radio itself made a big comeback due to this seismic shift. Beginning in early 1983 in Philadelphia, and rapidly spreading through the country, one or more FM stations in every city switched to Top 40 and many rose to the top of the ratings playing the mix of music made popular by MTV-young rock and urban hits.

In the age of "Thriller," black music made a resounding comeback on the pop charts. If 1982 was the genre's low point in terms of pop success, by 1985 more than one third of all the hits on the Billboard Hot 100 were of urban radio origin. Even Prince's "1999" single, shut out of pop radio upon its initial release in 1982, was re-launched in mid-1983 and off the back of its belated MTV exposure became a huge pop radio success the second time around. Thus, in a way few historians appreciate, the Michael Jackson/MTV team proved itself a remarkably progressive force, helping to reintegrate a fragmented popular culture at the dawn of the Reagan era. Black music was back at the center at the mainstream, and to this day it has never again been pushed from the spotlight.

As an aside, the rise of MTV conversely spelled doom for country music's fortunes in the pop world. Prior to MTV, country music had, since the early 70's, become increasingly strong at pop radio, with its popularity culminating in the summer of 1981, during the "Urban Cowboy" craze, just as MTV was being launched. That summer, there were an average of 11 country records on the Billboard Hot 100 in any given week. But MTV decided from day-one that country music would not be part of its programming and country's performance at pop radio steadily nosedived from that point onward. Soon, country records were completely shut out of the Hot 100, something that had never happened before.

For all its record-setting accomplishments, the thing which never ceases to amaze me is that Michael Jackson pulled off what is perhaps the rarest trick in any field: After more than a decade of being an absolutely huge superstar, top of his field, sure-thing Hall of Famer, etc., he somehow found an extra gear and suddenly transcended mere superstardom, redefining the very notion of how big someone in his field could be. Try imagining J.K. Rowling suddenly coming out with a series of books that were so much better and more popular than the Harry Potter books that they rendered them a mere footnote to her career and you'll get the idea of what Michael Jackson accomplished with "Thriller."

Newsweek's prediction just six month earlier that no new mass-appeal superstar would ever again emerge had proven spectacularly wrong, and for the time being, rock's doldrums had been cured. Robert Christgau proclaimed that 1984 was the greatest year for pop singles since the height of Beatlemania, crediting the revival of Top 40 radio and the integration of MTV for this development. And lest there be any doubt that "Thriller" truly did unify all corners of the pop audience, it's worth noting that it won the hipper-than-thou Village Voice critics' poll for album of the year in addition to all those Grammys.

Predictably, the death of Michael Jackson caused a lamentation about the impossibility of anyone ever doing it again. Shortly after Jackson's death The New York Times editorialized: "Fame on the the level Mr. Jackson has achieved is all but impossible for pop culture heroes today, and quite likely it will never be possible again." The similarity of these remarks to Newsweek's 1982 incorrect prediction is uncanny. The notion that never again will the conditions be right for a truly mass, sustainable musical moment is myopic, to say the least.

Despite a succession of on-line platforms that assume ever more fragmented audience niches, one would be foolish to bet against the potential for one to arise that encourages audience behavior which favors a vast coalition of sub-groups uniting behind something new and fantastic. Besides, pop music has always thrived on mass excitement; the yearning for shared cultural touchpoints seems to be hardwired into us. What "Thriller" taught us was that the right star, with the right product and the right technological environment, always has the ability to move us and to unite us all.

630 days ago
55.

Toallthehatersoftheworld    

Hope he gets better

629 days ago
56.

Vicky    

Any news? How's Joseph doing?

629 days ago
57.

gayforliztaylor    

Most people in Gary Indiana didn't die from drugs let alone Propofol. If Joe Jackson & Katherine hadn't convinced him to sleep in children's beds, Jackson would not have looked like the freakshow
from our favorite Halloween films and destroyed his children with his Propofol fuelled psychosis.
There's a reason why most superstars didn't die from criminal drug use, repeated Propofol theft, bribing criminals (more than one)
and lying about Propofol.
No superstar hung around with alcoholic, drug addicted friends and killed themselves with Propofol. Real victims get killed by drug dealers in car crashes/robberies because drug addicts begged for drugs from the desperate drug dealers and the drug dealers did anything to get paid!!

629 days ago
58.

phia    

Too bad the stroke was mild!

628 days ago
59.

What I Think    

I did read about Joe and MJ even though TMZ saw fit to delete what I said.

628 days ago
60.

Pegasus    

Bruno Mars: Every artist should want to be like Michael Jackson
HIT singer has long been a fan of the King of Pop, covering his songs and wearing his distinctive fedora-style hats and believes Jackson has set the bar for music artists.

Bruno Mars performs during the Victoria's Secret Fashion Show in New York
BRUNO Mars claims that every artist “should always aspire to be like Michael Jackson”.

The 27-year old, from Hawaii, who was the world’s biggest-selling male act of 2011 and is about to release his second album, has long been a fan of the King of Pop.

Last Sunday evening Bruno showed The X Factor hopefuls just how to do it with an incredible performance of his current single Locked Out of Heaven, which had show favourite Jahmene Douglas tweeting about him being an “amazing performer”.

And the American owes it to Jackson, who died in June 2009. Bruno said: “I feel like he set the bar for artists. Any artist, I don’t care what genre you do, you should always aspire to be like Michael Jackson.

“Because the details, the attention to detail he did on everything he did, everything he was a part of, you can look at what made him so iconic, the glove, the hat, the dancing, the music videos, the way he sang when he sang, everything he did was Michael Jackson, and he just kind of stamped that on the world.”

Although Jackson’s life was also mired in controversy, including child molestation allegations that he was acquitted of, his music continues to inspire.

Bruno impersonated Jackson’s song Smooth Criminal on US TV show Saturday Night Live recently and on The X Factor wore a fedora similar to the one Jacko wore in the video.

Bruno Mars impersonates Michael Jackson


“Oh no,” Bruno laughed, “I use my hat because my hair is a mess all the time.”

Jackson is not the only person Bruno is good at impersonating.

Growing up in Honolulu, Bruno’s dad, a Latin percussionist from Brooklyn, organised a Vegas-style revue with the family. Three-year-old Bruno, then known as Peter Gene Hernandez began performing Michael Jackson tunes and at four became an Elvis impersonator, performing five days a week with his family’s band.

He became the world’s youngest Elvis impersonator and had a cameo in the 1992 film Honeymoon in Vegas starring Nicolas Cage and Sarah Jessica Parker.

Who is easier to impersonate – the King or the King of Pop?

Before Bruno topped the charts, he impersonated Elvis Presley as a four-year-old


He said: “Neither, they are both amazing. It was more of a novelty I think because I was so little, so it wasn’t really like an accurate impersonation, it was more just a funny thing to watch. I never sounded like Elvis at all either or looked like Elvis.”

After leaving school, Bruno moved to Los Angeles and was signed to Motown Records in 2004.

Nothing developed but he met Philip Lawrence and Ari Levine and they formed songwriting/production team The Smeezingtons writing B.o.B’s Nothin’ On You, Travie McCoy’s Billionaire, Flo Rida’s Right Round and K’Naan’s Wavin’ Flag, which was the 2010 FIFA World Cup theme song.

Bruno then decided to go solo.

The name Bruno Mars came from wrestler Bruno Sanmartino.

The singer explained: “He was a wrestler in my dad’s day, and I used to walk around and I guess reminded him of that wrestler, so he used to always call me Bruno Sanmartino.

“When I was a kid, I used to walk around like I was big stuff.

“Mars is just joking around in a studio, and just kind of stating that I am out of this world.”

He’s getting there and after being a child impersonator is well on his way to having some of Elvis’s success.

Bruno sold more than five million albums and 45 million singles worldwide in 2011. His debut album Doo-Wops & Hooligans went to No1 in 2010 (selling six million copies globally).

His first three singles went to No1 in the UK – Just The Way You Are, Grenade and The Lazy Song.

Locked Out of Heaven has reached No2 and second album Unorthodox Jukebox will be released in the UK on December 10.

There are again lots of different styles from Motown and pop to rock and jazz.

Mark Ronson who worked on Locked Out of Heaven with Bruno reckoned the new album will “change the sound of music”.

The song sounds like The Police and Bruno’s not shying away from the similarity.

He said: “Yeah, I mean I feel like I gravitate more towards singers with high voices, so growing up, I always used to listen to Michael Jackson, The Police, Led Zeppelin, Stevie Wonder, Freddie Mercury, guys with high voices, because they’re the songs that I sing along to.

“I like to sing along to them, and I used to play. I used to perform Police songs in bands and as a songwriter, and a producer, you always aspire to kind of create music like that, because you see the reaction.

“A song like Roxanne, by the first chord, everyone starts lighting up, everyone’s faces light up. So it’s only natural that your influences trickle down into your music, because you have been singing them for so long. And I admired the songs for so long.”

He realises he’ll be singing Just The Way You Are and Grenade “until the day I die” which is why he wanted to do different-sounding songs like Locked Out of Heaven, to keep him excited.

Bruno Mars’ mind seems to go faster than the rest of us and he straddles many different musical styles.

Bruno, who plays piano, guitar and drums on the album, said: “The music industry is a weird place and it takes more to be a good singer.

“I learned that you had to show up to a record playboy and say, ‘This is my music, take it or leave it’. No one can create a Michael Jackson, no one can make a Led Zeppelin or The Beatles, it can’t be done, it has to be something there, and you have to give me that, you have to be the one to say, ‘This is me. Either you are in or you are out’.”

Bruno will be performing at Capital FM’s Jingle Bell Ball on December 8 alongside acts like One Direction, Cheryl Cole and JLS.

He is expected to be back for a proper tour in the spring, including Scotland.

He said: “It’s one thing to buy the song, like the song, like the lyrics, like the production, it’s another thing to see the artist perform that song, that’s why Michael Jackson is the best.

“To see him do it, to see whatever it is, the artistic way he brought it to life live, and paint a whole other picture and I feel like it was very important when you hear this album.

“I want people to be like, I’ve got to go see this show. It’s going to be a good show.”

Bruno Mars’ second album Unorthodox Jukebox will be released on December 10.
http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/enterta...l2ImIQ.twitter

628 days ago
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