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Mariel Hemingway Targeted in Pit Bull Probe

12/26/2010 5:10 AM PST BY TMZ STAFF

Actress Mariel Hemingway -- Ernest's granddaughter -- could lose her dog ... because according to Animal Control officials, her pooch went on the attack recently ... and sent two people to the hospital.

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A rep for Animal Control tells TMZ, the attack went down last week near Mariel's L.A. home -- her pit bull went after another dog and two humans, who were immediately sent to the hospital with serious puncture wounds.

Animal Control tells us, they're currently investigating the incident -- but for the meantime, Mariel's pit bull will be placed in quarantine.

Calls to Mariel -- famous for her role in Woody Allen's "Manhattan" -- haven't been returned.


39 COMMENTS

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31.

dar    

all pitbulls must die

1292 days ago
32.

Kate    

Baylee13,
Thank you for your kind words. It's very helpful, and I appreciate your taking the time to write them.
Wishing you all the best.
Kate

1292 days ago
33.

Jennifer    

So many idiots posting on this site who actually believe Pit Bulls are bad dogs. NO!! NO!! NO!! Do your research first before spreading lies. Did you know that the most highly decorated dogs in the service for rescuing our soldiers are Pits? Hmm?? They were considered the finest of dogs (The Little Rascals has a Pit named Petey) before our lame-ass media started messing with them. Pits are sweet, loving animals unless treated poorly and you can say that about any breed. BLAME THE OWNER NOT THE BREED!!

1291 days ago
34.

Jennifer    

HEY RANDOM MAC USER,,, WHEN ONE CALLS FOR THE EXTERMINATION OF AN ENTIRE SPECIES I CAN ONLY IMAGINE HOW EXCITED YOU WOULD HAVE GOTTEN DURING THE HOLOCAUST! YOU ARE SO OFF BASE WITH YOUR ASSESSMENT OF PITS, AND IF ONE DID ACTUALLY BITE YOU IM SURE YOU DESERVED IT!

1291 days ago
35.

Kate    

The breed is not what it used to be, and one of the most dangerous factors surrounding them are the wrongful attitudes adopted by many of their owners. Eventually after the attack I was able to do diligent research and was astounded by what I found. A prime example is of one that was reported on the UK's "Daily Mail" site about a year ago. A woman had adopted two very young pitt-bull puppies and raised them with exceptional tenderness and care, which was witnessed on a daily basis by her son and close neighbors. One day as they were out in the fenced yard excercising, she brought them home-made treats as she had always done before, when suddenly they violently attacked her, and continued the viscious attack unrelenting until she was dead.
I cringe when I hear supporters of the breed who somehow excuse all the overwhelming testimonies of people to the contrary as it being their fault. The baseless chant usually begins something like, "It is how you raise or treat them, not the breed." They arrogantly ignore the evidence and do not admit it until something tragic happens to either them or to someone in their family.
One prevalent observation is that most of these owners seem to enjoy the "fear-factor" that the ownership creates. Ultimately it is not only disrespectful to potential innocent victims, but also to the animal itself.

1290 days ago
36.

justin    

I have a friend who trains rotts for passive protection and belgian shepherds for active protection. He also used to voluteer at a shelter doing temperament evaluations on many dogs including a lot of pit bulls. He also trained voluteers in positive training techniques. He was once asked if he could keep a pit bull that was returned to the shelter after an adoption until they could find space or a foster for it. On the second day, the pit launched a full on attack on my friend when he opened the pit's crate in the morning. My friend - who is big and used to working with big dogs - got knoced off balance and got one forearm shredded and deep puncture wounds in both before he could get a hold of the dog and choke him off.

1290 days ago
37.

justin    

I have a friend who trains rottweilers for passive protection and belgian shepherds for active protection. He also used to voluteer at a shelter doing temperament assessment tests on large dogs and pit bulls and training the voluteers in positive training techniques. One of the pits he worked with came back to the shelter after being adopted out, and he was asked to take it for the weekend until they could find a foster or space opened up. This pit bull that he'd previously worked with for a month, launched a full scale attack for no reason when my friend opened his crate to take him out in the morning. He caught my friend off guard - he's a big guy used to working with big dogs - when he was bent over opening the crate. The pit knocked him down and went for my friend's face. He put his arms up, and one of his forearms was shredded, and both had deep puncture wounds before my friend could get a hold of him and choke him off.

1290 days ago
38.

shelly    

well Mariel if this pit bull is your campanion dog i dont think you would have to put it down. Allso if it's only halve pit you might have a chance too. I know of people who have pits and dont get around a mommy to be pit maybe this why this attacked happen. I hope your dog doen't get put down i look up to you and love you. I have a terry mixed too but it's a small dog. I know if you read this Mariel how can i love you not even not knowing you but it hard to explain and where to begin but you have gave a nobody a great self exteam. who has a learning disabity who wants to be secussfully like you.

1279 days ago
39.

jim    

People tend to polarize over the issue of pit bulls. I think it's true that when raised well, they pose no more threat than any other breed. My neighbors have a yellow lab that tries to bite me through the fence, he's so aggressive. Any dog can be raised to be mean. I think the problem with pits and rotties is that they were specifically bred for their bites to be powerful, so when they do attack, they do much more damage than, say, a Pomeranian.
But it's deeper than that. It's really not about the breed, but the owner. In my neck of the woods, you can almost profile the dog owner by the breed he owns. Pits are often bought to be aggressive and dangerous. It's a status thing in some cultures. And I'm not just talking about gangster culture. Here in Texas, it's common to see a pit tied to the back of a welding truck (anti-theft insurance). Getting these dogs sends a message to others, whether you intend it to or not, and owning one sets you up for a tragedy like Ms. Hemingway's, no matter how they were raised. As they say in AA, do a "deep and searching moral inventory" of WHY you want to own a pitbull. Do you feel threatened? A dog is not a very good defense against any threat. Do you need to assert your manliness to others? Go lift weights.
The breed was created for one purpose, to fight. Choosing one assumes that you know this and are willing to accept the risk if something goes bad.

1108 days ago
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